3 doctors weighed in:
What does it mean to get drunk? What happens to your body?
3 doctors weighed in

Dr. David Hunter
Psychiatry
1 doctor agrees
In brief: It is complicated
Alcohol is a central nervous system depressant.
As the alcohol enters your blood stream, the part of your brain that controls social interactions is suppressed and you may feel giddy and more talkative. As the process continues with further drinking, other more critical brain functions become supressed which eventually can lead to unconsciousness and suspension of respirations and death.

In brief: It is complicated
Alcohol is a central nervous system depressant.
As the alcohol enters your blood stream, the part of your brain that controls social interactions is suppressed and you may feel giddy and more talkative. As the process continues with further drinking, other more critical brain functions become supressed which eventually can lead to unconsciousness and suspension of respirations and death.
Dr. David Hunter
Dr. David Hunter
Thank
Dr. Alan Wartenberg
Addiction Medicine
In brief: Increasing sedation
Alcohol is a sedative, and the more we take in, the more sedated we get.
Individuals vary in their tolerance based on their prior use of alcohol and their own biology, but at some point (usually at levels > 100 mg%) it effects our balance, coordination, speech and judgement, and ultimately will cause sleep. If we drink beyond that, stupor, coma and death can occur. Legally, over 80mg% is drunk.

In brief: Increasing sedation
Alcohol is a sedative, and the more we take in, the more sedated we get.
Individuals vary in their tolerance based on their prior use of alcohol and their own biology, but at some point (usually at levels > 100 mg%) it effects our balance, coordination, speech and judgement, and ultimately will cause sleep. If we drink beyond that, stupor, coma and death can occur. Legally, over 80mg% is drunk.
Dr. Alan Wartenberg
Dr. Alan Wartenberg
Thank
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