Is it possible to get rid of liver cancer or is it fatal?

Depends on stage. Early liver cancer can be effectively treated by surgical removal. The best candidates for surgical removal are patients whose liver tumor has not spread beyond the liver, the size of the liver tumor is small, and the rest of the liver is healthy enough to withstand an operation. Another excellent option for some patients is liver transplantation. Talk with your doctor about your options.

Related Questions

Should a liver cancer patient receive the 4th tace treatment or not? 60yrs old, surviving 5th year after surgery of getting rid of a bottom tip of liver (5cm) has to make a decision whether to take another treatment, transarterial chemoembolization. Diag

Transarterial . Transarterial chemoembolization (tace) can cause side effects, as you've described, and can have prolonged recovery. The degree to which each patient experiences such side effects varies with several factors, including tumor burden (more tumor means more side effects) and the specific tace regimen used. Some regimens are much more aggressive than others, which may improve survival but may also increase the degree and suration of side effects. I would recommend that the patient discuss the tace regimen with his/her doctor and determine whether it could be modified for patient comfort. For eaxmple, if the regimen includes cisplatin, it might be reasonable to discontinue that medication or reduce the dose. If the regimen uses a lot of embolic particles, it might be reasonable to switch to using Ethiodol (an oil) as the only embolic agent. Another thing to consider is switching to yttrium radioisotope embolization. This is a newer technique that has far fewer side effects than tace, but which requires additional testing and is very expensive if not covered by insurance. You asked whether the treatment would make the patient live more than 2 years. This is an impossible question to answer with certainty, but the fact is that most patients with hepatitis c and liver cancer do not live as long as this patient already has. That suggests that the treatments so far, unpleasant as they may have been, were very successful. Will additional treatments help even more? No way to know for sure, especially without more information about this specific case, but the patient's past history suggests that the answer may be yes. Read more...
Quality of life. Tace doesn't cure liver cancer. It will help extend life in some patients. If you have tolerated treatments in the past without much difficultly it is likely you will not have a huge problem with this treatment either and it could help to extend your life. If you have a really hard time with the procedure and are sick for weeks afterwards you have to take that into account. Read more...

Need expert advice! Where to get treatment for liver cancer?

Start. With your family doctor to get a referral to a medical oncology specialist. They can help determine best treatment choices and if surgery would be helpful. Depends on what type of cancer it is, if it is primary in liver or metastatic from another source, cirrhosis or not, etc. Read more...
Hepatobiliary surg. There is a discipline of general surgery, which specializes in liver and bile duct problems, called hepatobiliary surgery. Many academic tertiary medical centers have such surgeons, you should contact one closest to you to be seen. Treatment will depend on input by medical oncology and hepatologists (specializes in liver diseases), depending on the type of cancer and other conditions. Read more...

What’s the best treatment for liver cancer? My aunt was diagnosed with liver cancer and i’m wondering what’s the first, best treatment? Her doctor says chemo, but we want her to get a second opinion.

It's . It's really difficult to answer this question without much more detailed information. There are many options for treating liver cancer, including chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery (including liver transplant), but the most appropriate option in your aunt's case depends on a great many variables that are unknown to me. Systemic chemotherapy is usually of pretty limited value if the cancer in question is hepatocellular carcinoma. On the other hand, it might be very effective for metastatic disease. I see that you're in ann arbor, mi. I would suggest that you contact the liver tumor clinic at the university of michigan. They have a multidisciplinary team that will be able to provide whatever type of treatment is most appropriate. Read more...