5 doctors weighed in:

Who is more likely at risk for biliary atresia?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Jason Hemming
Internal Medicine - Gastroenterology
3 doctors agree

In brief: Post Transplant

There are two forms of biliary atresia - congenital (at birth) or acquired.
The acquired type most often occurs in the setting of autoimmune disease (though no way to calculate risk) and is one form of chronic rejection of a transplanted liver allograft.

In brief: Post Transplant

There are two forms of biliary atresia - congenital (at birth) or acquired.
The acquired type most often occurs in the setting of autoimmune disease (though no way to calculate risk) and is one form of chronic rejection of a transplanted liver allograft.
Dr. Jason Hemming
Dr. Jason Hemming
Thank
Dr. Troy Reyna
Surgery - Pediatric
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Infants

Infants over the age of 2 weeks who are still jaundiced or getting worse should be worked up for biliary atresia.
Yellow tinge to whites of eyes dark urine, big belly, and pale putty colored stools should prompt alarm and get ultrasound of gallbladder and lliver.

In brief: Infants

Infants over the age of 2 weeks who are still jaundiced or getting worse should be worked up for biliary atresia.
Yellow tinge to whites of eyes dark urine, big belly, and pale putty colored stools should prompt alarm and get ultrasound of gallbladder and lliver.
Dr. Troy Reyna
Dr. Troy Reyna
Thank
Read more answers from doctors