What are available treatment options for biliary atresia?

Surgery. Kasai procedure attaches liver to bowel to drian bile. Nutrition support, especially for calories, fats, fat soluble vitamins, zn. May need liver transplant.
Several. No surgery. Kassi procedure. Liver transplant if kasai does not work or if not performed prior to 60 days of life.

Related Questions

Biliary atresia treatment?

Kasai procedure. Biliary atresia is most often diagnosed in the neonates. The first line treatment is a surgical procedure called portoenterotomy (kasai) in which a loop of intestine is connected to the liver to act as a conduit for bile drainage in place of the missing bile ducts. The beneficial effects of this procedure, however, is often short-lived many children went on to require liver transplantation. Read more...
Surgery. First a patient will have a measurement of bile in blood and looking for conjugated versus unconjugated bile. An ultrasound will be done to look for presence or absence of gallbladder. A hida scan will assess whether bile is being excreted into the intestine. If abnormal the patient will need open liver biopsy , cholangiogram and possible kasai procedure. Read more...

What happens if the initial treatment for biliary atresia fails?

Liver transplant. If you mean surgery, i.e. Kasai procedure, as "the initial treatment", then liver transplantation is often needed. Untreated, chronic bile buildup leads to cirrhosis and liver failure. Read more...
Transplant. Treatment for biliary atresia is a kasai procedure which should be done before 60 days of life to be effective. One third of patients will do well and be cured. One third will do well for a period of time(years) but will eventually need a liver transplant. The final third will fail kasai and need a liver transplant sooner. Read more...

Is surgery a possible cure for biliary atresia?

Yes. Biliary atresia is an unusual condition usually in newborn babies. Surgery can be used to bypass the blocked bile ducts. Each person and condition is different, and a pediatric surgeon specialist may know what is best. Read more...
Yes. One third of patients can be potentially cured if they get a kasai procedure in timely manner. Read more...
YES. Biliary atresia involves both intra- and extra hepatic bile duct pathology. Standard extrahepatic bypass can provide extended survival for a minority of patients. Liver transplantation provides the only possibility for cure, though it carries with it significant morbidity and mortality. Read more...

Are there different options for treating biliary atresia?

Depends. Ba describes a variable issue that is basicly plumbing too small to let the waste drain out of the liver.Intrahepatic (small drainpipes inside the liver) it is worse than extrahepatic (pipes outside liver). If a bypass can be created by 6-8wks, drainage can improve. However, many of these must have living donor partial liver transplant when or if the liver fails. Read more...
Biliary atresia. Liver transplant is an option. A partial liver resection with connection of bowel to the surronding ducts (if are adequate in size to connect to) is an other option. Read more...

Who is more likely at risk for biliary atresia?

Post Transplant. There are two forms of biliary atresia - congenital (at birth) or acquired. The acquired type most often occurs in the setting of autoimmune disease (though no way to calculate risk) and is one form of chronic rejection of a transplanted liver allograft. Read more...
Infants. Infants over the age of 2 weeks who are still jaundiced or getting worse should be worked up for biliary atresia. Yellow tinge to whites of eyes dark urine, big belly, and pale putty colored stools should prompt alarm and get ultrasound of gallbladder and lliver. Read more...

What are common complications associated with biliary atresia?

Liver. Rare, serious disease. More in girls, blacks, asians; 1:10, 000 diagnosed early in life (< 1 month), jaundiced/yellowed. Special diet, surgery (kasai procedure) to put drainage for bile. If unsuccessful, need liver transplant. Untreated, bile buildup causes cirrhosis (scarring of liver) and liver failure. After liver transplant, need special meds and follow up. Read more...

What is the liver biliary atresia?

Severely narrow duct. We occasionally find infants who appear normal at birth, yet as they get older & grow bigger, the bile (waste) from the liver is unable to get out. The bile ducts are the drainage system for the liver.Arising before or after birth, the drains are to tiny & bile backs up.The infants poo changes from brown to white. Common rx include surgery to unblock ducts or a liver transplant. Read more...
Biliary atresia. Biliary atresia is a congenital scarring of the biliary ducts. These ducts transport bile made in the liver to the intestine so one can digest fats. The ducts scar and obliterate. Bile then cannot exit the liver which poisons the liver. These infants need corrective surgery before they are 2 months old. Read more...

Is biliary atresia detected before birth?

Not generally. Some types can be seen soon after birth; evaluation is undertaken at that time. Read more...
No. Biliary atresia is unsuspected until there is a persistent rise in bilirubin of the direct type. Initial imaging study should be a preprandial gall bladder ultrasound to see if gall bladder is present. Read more...