What are common bacterial infections in newborns?

See below. Streptococcus agalactiae, aka, group b strep., escherichia coli, and staphylococcus aureus are major culprits. They are responsible for neonatal sepsis (blood poisoning), meningitis, pneumonia, uti, and bone and joint infection.

Related Questions

Are bacterial infections worse for a newborn?

Depends on germ/kid. The newborn represents a problem because of exposure to germs in a specialized way. The bag of waters surrounds baby & keeps germs out during pregnancy but when open, the birth canal may allow moms poop germs to climb into the babies area and attach. Later they may dig in and grow fast without showing signs. By the time baby seems sick (gbs) the infection may be so far along that nothing will help. Read more...
Depends. Bacterial infections are bad. When they get into the brain, blood etc. It can be very bad.The problem is that in newborns you don't always see the signs that something bad is going on like you would see in someone older, so you don't always know whether a newborn is very sick or a little sick, so we wind up treating sick newborns as if they have something life threatening until we know they don't. Read more...

How common is septicemia as complication for a bacterial infection?

Depends. What bacteria, what type of infection, in whom? Septicemia means bacteria multiplying in the bloodstream. It can potentially occur in almost any form of bacterial infection but is not easily predictable. Read more...

Are bacterial infections common during elbow replacement surgery?

No, but does happen. Infections are a known complication of joint replacement and despite our better efforts, they still occur. Most patients are given antibiotics prior to surgery and the skin is prepped with bacterial killing solution. After surgery the wounds are covered to prevent contamination. An infection requires IV antibiotics and surgical washout. Sometimes the joint has to be removed to clear the infection. Read more...
No. Infections in total elbow arthroplasties exist. They occur about 3% of the time which is low but higher than other joint replacements. Read more...

Is the incubation period (infection to symptoms) for common viral/bacterial infections the same in a 4 week old as an adult?

Incubation period. Incubation periods do not vary by age, how severe the presenting symptoms are does vary by the age of the patient. Remember most incubation periods reflect a SPAN of time between exposure and presentation and are not usually exact. Read more...
Yes. The incubation period for viruses and bacteria are related to the organism in question, not the age of the host. Read more...

How common is bacterial infection in anti tnf medication treatment?

Depends. Every individual's immune system and environment is different. It is to worry about unusual infections rather than frequency of infection........Tb, fungus, mai. Read more...
Higher but still low. Anti-tumor necrosis factor drugs have emerged as important agents in the treatment of many chronic inflammatory diseases. One of the risks of anti-tnf therapy is the small but significant risk of serious opportunistic infection. These include increased risks of certain fungal, viral and bacterial infections, but not to all pathogens. The risk is still small and should be balanced with benefits. Read more...

How common are secondary bacterial infections or sepsis with a mono infection?

Not quantified. Secondary bacterial infections are common enough to make most of the lists of complications of ebv that leads to infectious mononucleosis, but i could not find that a case rate had been published at this time (i.e. A percentage of cases that develop secondary infections). The illness does cause relative immune compromise through splenic inflammation and neutropenia in some cases. Read more...