If heart failure patients retain fluid in their system can they die from drowning?

Similar. Pulmonary edema from heart failure is an excess of water in the lungs. The water in drowning itself causes problems as it can contain bacteria and pulls water out of the cells in the lung. The water from heart failure, if removed, has not usually caused an injury to the lung itself. If not removed, it will lead to death.

Related Questions

Can a thalassemia patient die from heart failure?

In severe cases... Heart failure is most commonly seen in those patients with beta-thal major. One of the main reasons for heart failure is that the heart gets damaged over time from iron overload, due to the many blood transfusions needed and the disease itself. There are medicines that can help with iron overload. It is essential to get care early from a hematologist to help with long and short term effects. Read more...

If a patient has pulmonary edema and has heart failure occurring, should I.v fluids be ceased? And should iv fluids not be recommenced?

In most cases. the doctor has to find happy medium, but they should be giving diuretics and other meds to get fluid off, plus sometimes heart medicine. Some fluid may be given, depends on condition, but usually limited. Read more...

What's the standard treatment for a class 2 patient with systolic heart failure?

Depends. Treatment of systolic or diastolic is different. Class ii refers to degree of symptoms relative to activity level, independent of systolic or diastolic etiology. Diastolic heart failure is treated with control of bp, e.g. Beta blockers. Treatment of systolic heart failure would include beta blocker +/- ace inhibitor or arb, +/- diuretic and possibly spironolacton. Read more...
Check out this . Informative link. Take care and happy holidays! http://www.Mayoclinic.Com/health/heart-failure/ds00061. Read more...

What are some drugs which may be used in the management of the patient with heart failure?

HF drugs. Several different classes of drugs are used to treat hf. Beta-blockers(carvedilol, bisoprolol, metoprolol succinate), ace inhibitors or arb's (angiotensin receptor blockers), aldosterone antagonists (spironolactone, eplerenone), and diuretics as needed. Digoxin can be added for heart rate control in those patients who have atrial fibrillation but is not a mainstay of therapy. Read more...
Heart failure meds. . Heart failure medications include beta blockers, diuretics, ace inhibitors, digoxin. These are used in various combinations to achieve better heart function and control of symptoms. Read more...

If a patient has mitral stenosis how will this effect heart failure risk?

May Increase. If mitral stenosis is severe, pressure increases in the blood vessels of the lungs, resulting in heart failure with fluid accumulation in the lungs and a low level of oxygen in the blood. Read more...

Is it dangerous for a heart failure patient to abruptly discontinue atenolol?

Depends. If the heart failure is due to coronary disease, then abrupt discontinuation of a beta blocker could be a problem. If there is a compelling reason to hold the beta blocker in other circumstances, it can be held; just remember that beta blockers are important adjuncts to heart failure treatment, so coordinate with the doctors. Read more...
Yes. Stopping beta blockers (such as atenolol) can be dangerous due to a 'rebound' effect of unopposed activation of beta receptors. The beta blockers should be gradually discontinued if there is a need to. Thus being said, atenolol is probably not a great beta blocker to treat systolic heart failure; the best are bisoprolol, Carvedilol and metoprolol succinate. Read more...

What should a heart failure patient take they're contraindicated to beta blockers?

Contraindicated? Betablockers are commonly used and in fact recommended for the treatment of heart failure. They are usually not started in the acute, decompensated patient, especially if in shock or with low blood pressures. Read more...
Heart failure. It really depends on the type of heart failure. Here are some of the common options 1.Acei inhibitors (if no contraindication) 2. Hydralazine and nitrates 3. Calcium channel blockers. Read more...
Manny Choices. If beta blockers are contraindicated there are many other choices depending on your case 1diuretics 2ace inhibiters 3arbs angiotensin reseptor blockers 4calcium channel blockers 5aldactone inhibiters 6blood vessel dilators 7digoxin 8heart pump meds every case is differernt and your cardiologist will prescribe what is good for you if beta blockers are contraindicated. Read more...