What are the causes of acute tubular necrosis?

Ischemia, drugs. Acute tubular necrosis (atn) can happen if the kidney has severely reduced blood supply (ischemia). This could be caused by hypotension (very low blood pressure), volume depletion (as a result of illness or trauma), problems with the blood vessels supplying the kidneys (renal artery blockage), and drugs that affect the flow of blood to the kidneys. Drugs and toxins can also directly cause atn.

Related Questions

I have decreased urination, could this be caused by acute tubular necrosis?

Very unlikely. Decreased urination almost always relates to either reduced fluid intake or increased fluid losses such as diarrhea or increased sweating. In the rare instance when low urine output is due to kidney disease, weight gain from the accumulated water retention should be measurable on a daily bases. Read more...

Can you explain acute tubular necrosis?

Ischemia, drugs. Acute tubular necrosis (atn) can happen if the kidney has severely reduced blood supply (ischemia). This could be caused by hypotension (very low blood pressure), volume depletion (as a result of illness or trauma), problems with the blood vessels supplying the kidneys (renal artery blockage), and drugs that affect the flow of blood to the kidneys. Drugs and toxins can also directly cause atn. Read more...

What is the difference between acute renal failure and acute tubular necrosis?

Here are some... Acute renal failure is a general term denoting kidneys not able to good enough to manage water and electrolytes due to acute conditions such as shocks from various reasons, and acute tubular necrosis denotes what can be seen in kidney tissue under microscopic exam if biopsy is done, but not necessary for almost all cases. Clinically, they all tell us kidneys not working enough from acute causes. . Read more...

How is a tubular necrosis diagnosed?

ATN. Acute tubular necrosis is classified as a "renal" (i.e. Not pre-renal or post-renal) cause of acute kidney injury. Diagnosis is made by a fena (fractional excretion of sodium) > 3% and presence of muddy casts (a type of granular cast) in urinalysis and by histopathology. Read more...