What is the best surgical correction for pelvic organ prolapse?

Patient specific. The best surgical treatment is one that is tailored to your specific findings and complaints. One surgery does not fit all patients. There is controversy about newer mesh surgery versus older methods. There is more and more robotic prolapse surgery. The best surgery is one done to your specific needs by a surgeon who does these surgeries often and has experience.
Pelvic organ prolaps. True pelvic organ prolapse is best treated by sacral colpopexy. This can be performed in a minimally invasive fasion using the davinci robbotic system. Site specific repair is a good option if the defect is isolated or if the apex of the vagina/uterus is well supported.

Related Questions

If the doctors can no longer use mesh how will they fix my pelvic organ prolapse?

Other methods. Some mesh surgery is still available. Some companies have abandoned their mesh products because of the generally unfair negative publicity. Bad outcomes in most mesh surgeries are related to surgeon inexperience and poor patient selection, not an inherently bad product. Long before mesh was available there were and still are non-mesh surgical alternatives using conventional sutures. Read more...
Many options. Most of the issues that are being discussed in the media are related to vaginal placed pelvic floor mesh. Native tissue repair, biologic implants and abdominally repairs are all options. Additionally, in the right patient with an experienced surgeon vaginally placed mesh products remain a viable option. Read more...

Anyone have cure without mesh for pelvic organ prolapse?

Yes. Pessaries can help but most women won't use them long term. Mesh seems to be the only permanent solution since you treat the vaginal prolapse as the hernia that it is. The colporrhaphy operations are over 100 years old and treat a lateral defect with a central repair & usually don't hold. Despite the lawyer's commercials, most mesh repairs do very well. Read more...
Yes. Treatment of pop without mesh or graft may be non surgical by using a pessary and/or in mild cases pelvic floor physical therapy. Surgical treatment may be by traditional a & p repair, (procedures that are over 100 years old) witch now are called native tissue repairs or sacrospinous fixation ( attaching the vagina to a ligament in the pelvis) . The problem with these is high failure rates. Read more...
Most repairs can use. Your own tissue and stitches. Mesh is still appropriate in some cases. When used by an experienced gyn surgeon or urogynecologist it has reasonable risks. Make sure your surgeon does these surgeries regularly. . Read more...

Is it safe to lift weights above your head or lateral raises if you have pelvic organ prolapse (while seated on an exercise ball)?

Valsalva pressure. Whenever one holds a breath and strains down to defecate, urinate or lift weights, the suspended pelvic organs tend to do a "deep dive" towards the floor of the pelvis, putting a gravitational strain on the same. In other words,, the pelvic organs will tend to prolapse even further then they have if weights are continuously lifted. Read more...

Can postmenopausal estrogen deficiency make your pelvic organ prolapse look worse than it really is?

No. not directly. This prolapse is a condition generally requiring surgery and occurs in older women (particularly those with multiple past pregnancies. The age of the patients explains the concurrence of estogen deficiency! Hope this helps Dr Z. Read more...

How often does vaginal birth cause incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse? How common are these problems after a normal birth?

COMPLICATIONS. Delivery complications are not common but it happens sometimes. Your OB can explain better. Read more...
Common. In the first 3 months following vaginal delivery urinary incontinence is very common but typically improves/resolves. One study demonstrated approximately 40% of women had incontinence that persisted 12 years after delivery. Read more...
Tissue damage. As the baby passes through the birth canal it can cause damage to the supportive tissues around the vagina, bladder, urethra and rectum. In time this can lead to mobility in the urethra and leaking urine with certain activities. It can also result in dropping or prolapse of the pelvic organs. Chance of these problems increases with the number of vaginal births and with age. Read more...