For dementia patients what kind of long-term care options exist?

In vs out of home . Long-term care options are usually either in-home or residential treatment. In the very early stages of dementia the patient can usually get by with family support. As the patient moves into the middle stages of dementia in-home care such as home health options are usually needed. As a patient moves into the later stages of dementia, residental or even hospital care may be indicated.
Many variables. There are both home care and senior facility options, depending on the severity of the dementia, the needs and resources of the family, etc. The senior facilities range in care from independent living, assisted living, and nursing home. A geriatric care manager -- often an rn or social worker -- could help you review options in your area, and consider your specific needs.

Related Questions

How to integrate dementia patients in long-term care community?

Assess and adapt. Anyone entering a long-term care situation has individual preferences and needs ( food, activities, interests, etc). Which must be assessed on admission. What physical capabilities and limitations does s/he have -- and what's been meaningful to him/her before? What adaptations can the unit make so that s/he can participate and have emotional needs met? Staff must consider all these things. Read more...

What is a good way to integrate dementia patients in long-term care?

No cookbook way. Each individual and the prior family dynamics play into this process. "controlling" type personalities adjust less well in many cases. The degree of impairment often plays a role as less demented often resist integration more then advanced dementias(not always though!) lesser demented patients often transition better if preceded by day programs prior to permanent placement- sometimes. Read more...

When is a patient with dementia better off in a long term care facility?

See below. It's a difficult decision for a family. With the progression of dementia, clients may forget to eat, to bathe and to take care of their basic needs. They might forget to turn off the gas stove, they might forget to take their meds. If finances let you, you might want to start with the caregiver option at home. At some point, there comes the time when the decision about placement should be made. Read more...
Increased anxiety. Or other behavioral changes often mean that a person's environment is not supportive enough for their declining level of functioning. A geriatrric psychiatrist or geriatrician can help with an assesment. Read more...