7 doctors weighed in:
What is your single biggest frustration with your patients as a clinician?
7 doctors weighed in

Dr. Pamela Pappas
Psychiatry
6 doctors agree
In brief: Expectations
People sometimes expect the doctor to "fix" them, without their needing to investigate or alter their behavior in any way.
Getting sick is like a wake-up call, since so many of our diseases are lifestyle-driven. These same people often do not understand that authentic healing is an incremental, not "one fell swoop, " process -- requiring participation of both patient and doctor.

In brief: Expectations
People sometimes expect the doctor to "fix" them, without their needing to investigate or alter their behavior in any way.
Getting sick is like a wake-up call, since so many of our diseases are lifestyle-driven. These same people often do not understand that authentic healing is an incremental, not "one fell swoop, " process -- requiring participation of both patient and doctor.
Dr. Pamela Pappas
Dr. Pamela Pappas
Thank
1 comment
Dr. Steven Tucker
I completely and enthusiastically agree with this answer and offer an additional view. Frustration arises from miscommunication, however, I feel it is the doctors job to be an excellent communicator. If a doctor gets frustrated perhaps we are not listening/communicating in the best way to be heard. Not an issue of patient listening, an issue of how we are speaking. I don't want to blame the patient.
Dr. Alan Ali
Psychiatry
3 doctors agree
In brief: Frustration
Non-compliance with recommended treatment inspire of time spent explaining benefits and risks involved, basically lack of motivation to change or make treatment work for self.

In brief: Frustration
Non-compliance with recommended treatment inspire of time spent explaining benefits and risks involved, basically lack of motivation to change or make treatment work for self.
Dr. Alan Ali
Dr. Alan Ali
Thank
Dr. Miroslava Fox
Clinical Psychology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Case-dependent
Very individual-dependent:client and provider. For me it has to do with treatment non-adherence.
There are reasons why people stop taking medicine or going to psychotherapy sessions, or relapsing back into addictions, you just have to explore all that with a client and pick up things from there. As a therapist, have to monitor reactions to particular things, so they won't interfere with treatment.

In brief: Case-dependent
Very individual-dependent:client and provider. For me it has to do with treatment non-adherence.
There are reasons why people stop taking medicine or going to psychotherapy sessions, or relapsing back into addictions, you just have to explore all that with a client and pick up things from there. As a therapist, have to monitor reactions to particular things, so they won't interfere with treatment.
Dr. Miroslava Fox
Dr. Miroslava Fox
Thank
Read more answers from doctors