How does rheumatic fever damage mitral valve?

Collateral Damage. Our immune system turns on its defenses after exposure to group a strep (strep throat for example). The bacteria is targeted and eliminated. Sometimes the immune system erroneously targets the mitral valve, heart muscle, kidneys and joints. Hence, in trying to eliminate strep collateral damage occurs.

Related Questions

Why does acute rheumatic fever target the mitral valve causing stenosis?

Autoimmune . The immunologic response the strep infection causes antibodies and cellular responses. But some of these same antibodies also react to certain heart tissue also causing heart damage. The immune response becomes autoimmune to the body tissues. Read more...

Why does acute rheumatic fever target the mitral valve to cause mitral valve stenosis?

It can target any va. Rheumatic fever is no respecter of valves. Mitral valve, followed by aortic valve involvement occur. Rarely is the pulmonic or tricuspid valve involved. Of course, joints, skin (rash) nodules and various neurologic sequelae are also found. Read more...
Pancarditis. The characteristic involvement of the heart by ARF attacks all layers (endocardium, myocardium, epicardium, pericardium, etc.). Why the mitral valve is damaged to a greater degree than other valves is not known. The sequence is mitral, aortic, mitral and aortic, tricuspid and very infrequently, pulmonic. Read more...

Why would acute rheumatic fever target the mitral valve causing mitral valve stenosis?

No one really knows. Good question. But the answer is obscure. Rheumatic fever also affects the aortic valve. But why it targets valves on the right side of the heart is unclear. These are valves that are subject to greater pressures whih may be a reason. Read more...
May target any valve. Acute rheumatic fever may cause a pancarditis that can affect any heart valve. The mitral and/or aortic valves appear to be involved most often probably because damage to these left-sided valves will cause more symptoms than damage to the right-sided valves (tricuspid and pulmonary valves). Read more...

My husband was told he needs heart surgery for mitral valve regurgitation and his aorta valve. My husband has been told he needs heart surgery for valves in his heart. Should he get a 2nd opinion? Also I had rheumatic fever as a child. I was told about

Hi . Hi mary, thank you for your questions. First let's start with your husband. There are specific criteria for determining when a heart valve should be repaired or replaced. They are outlined in guidelines from the american heart association and american college of cardiology. Without knowing more specific details about his case, i can only make some general points. First, when there is excessive leaking from the mitral or aortic valves, this causes the heart to dilate and eventually weaken. Alternatively, when the aortic valve gets calcified, thick and narrowed this is called aortic stenosis. When this condition is severe, very high pressure builds up in the heart and the muscle thickens and eventually fails. If left untreated, any of these conditions can cause permanent and severe heart damage. Your husband may need one or both repaired or replaced. Double valve surgery is higher risk, but still feasible. There is no reason to get a second opinion if your doctor can clearly explain to you the criteria by which he needs both valves replaced. It is important to see a surgeon that you trust and who has good reported surgical outcomes. As far as your case, your rapid weight gain and symptoms of fatigue, breathlessness and chest pain are all symptoms of heart failure. If you have rheumatic heart disease, you may also have a bad valve as the cause for these symptoms. You should see a cardiologist and have a complete physical and an echocardiogram (heart ultrasound). If the problem is with your valve, it may be able to be repaired or perhaps replaced. Read more...
Mary, I . Mary, i agree with everything that dr. Moorman pointed out. I would add that generally speaking, if the recommendations made by his cardiologist are sound, and you and your husband would feel better by seeking a second opinion, then your cardiologist should support you. If they don't then i would be concerned that the recommendations being given are not based on as sound of decision making as you might otherwise be led to believe. Read more...
Possibly. If you have questions, ask your doctor. There is nothing wrong with getting another opinion. Read more...

I have diagnosed with mitral valve prolapse with trivial mr. Have ESR 27mm/hr. I had history of rheaumatic fever and is there any problem?

It depends. With history of rheumatic fever, it is ideal to check the nature of the mitral valve. While the mr is trivial, the echo findings can help in the evaluation for surgical intervention, aside from symptoms. The expertise of the cardiologist and cv surgeon is critical in DX and rx . Even with trivial mr, surgery maybe needed especially with atrial fibrillation hx. But, you will need to be seen again. Read more...

Do all prolonged fevers in a mitral valve prolapsed patient mean endocarditis?

Fever. Prolonged fever needs to be evaluated. Endocarditis is one possibility for a cause. Read more...
Usually not. Usually not, but you should have your own doctor check you. Read more...
No. There are many infectious and non infection causes of prolonged fever. Prolonged fever in a patient with an abnormal heart valve always warrants a diagnostic work up to rule out endocarditis. This includes at least multiple blood cultures and a cardiac echo preferably a trans-esophageal echo. Read more...