7 doctors weighed in:
My oral surgeon wants to use diprivan. Is this common?
7 doctors weighed in

Dr. Paul Grin
Pain Management
2 doctors agree
In brief: Recommended
Propofol is routinely used for oral surgery and is also used in critically ill patients.
Propofol has been shown in clinical studies to be a safe agent.

In brief: Recommended
Propofol is routinely used for oral surgery and is also used in critically ill patients.
Propofol has been shown in clinical studies to be a safe agent.
Dr. Paul Grin
Dr. Paul Grin
Thank
Dr. Anthony Pollizzi
Anesthesiology
In brief: Possibly
some oral surgeons do use this for sedation make sure you are properly monitored while under sedation

In brief: Possibly
some oral surgeons do use this for sedation make sure you are properly monitored while under sedation
Dr. Anthony Pollizzi
Dr. Anthony Pollizzi
Thank
Dr. James Hargan
Surgery - Oral & Maxillofacial
In brief: Yes
Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained in anesthesiology and emergencies and airway management.
It is very common for them to use Diprivan (or propofol) in their office.

In brief: Yes
Oral and maxillofacial surgeons are extensively trained in anesthesiology and emergencies and airway management.
It is very common for them to use Diprivan (or propofol) in their office.
Dr. James Hargan
Dr. James Hargan
Thank
Dr. Daniel Sampson
Surgery - Oral & Maxillofacial
In brief: Yes
Diprivan is a wonderful medication for anesthesia and is used quite a bit by oral surgeons.
It is short acting, has some anti-nausea properties and low incidence of side-effects such as a "hangover".

In brief: Yes
Diprivan is a wonderful medication for anesthesia and is used quite a bit by oral surgeons.
It is short acting, has some anti-nausea properties and low incidence of side-effects such as a "hangover".
Dr. Daniel Sampson
Dr. Daniel Sampson
Thank
Dr. Kevin Nasky
Psychiatry
In brief: Yes
Propofol (diprivan) is commonly used for so-called "conscious sedation, " which is sort of an "anesthesia-lite, " where a patient can be kept comfortable during a procedure while preserving cardiorespiratory functioning (i.
e. The patient can breath on his/her own, and therefore not require intubation and mechanical ventilation). The effects are shorter-acting, allowing patients to recover faster.

In brief: Yes
Propofol (diprivan) is commonly used for so-called "conscious sedation, " which is sort of an "anesthesia-lite, " where a patient can be kept comfortable during a procedure while preserving cardiorespiratory functioning (i.
e. The patient can breath on his/her own, and therefore not require intubation and mechanical ventilation). The effects are shorter-acting, allowing patients to recover faster.
Dr. Kevin Nasky
Dr. Kevin Nasky
Thank
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