6 doctors weighed in:

What is the mechanism of action of lidocaine as a local anesthetic?

6 doctors weighed in
Dr. William Jenkins
Anesthesiology
2 doctors agree

In brief: It blocks

The sodium channels that are necessary for nerve conduction thus blocking sensation, and motor muscle movement at higher concentrations, some nerves are harder to block than others.

In brief: It blocks

The sodium channels that are necessary for nerve conduction thus blocking sensation, and motor muscle movement at higher concentrations, some nerves are harder to block than others.
Dr. William Jenkins
Dr. William Jenkins
Thank
Dr. Karen Sibert
Anesthesiology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Nerves are blocked

Lidocaine temporarily blocks initiation and conduction of impulses in nerves.
This means that the affected area of the body does not feel sensation. Depending on the concentration of Lidocaine that is used, movement is also partially or completely blocked. Sympathetic nerves are blocked too, which can cause lower blood pressure when Lidocaine is used in epidural anesthesia.

In brief: Nerves are blocked

Lidocaine temporarily blocks initiation and conduction of impulses in nerves.
This means that the affected area of the body does not feel sensation. Depending on the concentration of Lidocaine that is used, movement is also partially or completely blocked. Sympathetic nerves are blocked too, which can cause lower blood pressure when Lidocaine is used in epidural anesthesia.
Dr. Karen Sibert
Dr. Karen Sibert
Thank
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