Stasis dermatitis--any cures?

Protect. Avoid things that make you break out, soaps & wetness. Wash your hands only when necessary. Wear gloves when needed. Wear clothes made of cotton. Bathe only with a small amount of mild unscented soap, such as dove. Keep the water temperature cool or warm, not hot. Use the medicine your doctor gave you. Use a plain moisturizer daily. Avoid scratching or rubbing the itchy area. Manage stress.
Stasis. Although extensive work has been completed in the study of treatment of venous ulcers, no large, well-controlled trials examine the treatment of stasis dermatitis. The overall mainstay of treatment has always been aimed at lessening the clinical impact of the underlying venous insufficiency, which is typically accomplished with compression therapy.

Related Questions

Cure for stasis dermatitis?

Stasis dermatitis. Skin changes which result from deposition of iron from sluggish return of blood due to varicose veins and/or venous insufficiency. Compression stockings or support hose and sometimes vein surgery. Read more...
Reduce Reflux. Skin ulcerations due to vein disease are known as venous stasis ulcerations. Venous pressure due to venous reflux causes fluid leak from distended veins. This stagnation of fluid results in swelling, discoration of the skin, hemosiderin deposits, inflammation.....Skin ulcers. Vein ablation or closure along with compression are the main stay of therapy. See surgeon, american college of phlebology. Read more...

Is there a cure/treatment for stasis dermatitis?

Venous insufficiency. stasis dermatitis is a sign of longstanding vein problems in the legs. The primary treatment is intermittent leg elevation and compression. SFrom minorp vascular proceduresa– Consult your vascular surgeon. Some patients may benefit from minor vein procedures-- see your vascular surgeon. Read more...

What is stasis dermatitis?

Discolored skin. Venous insufficiency ("leaky vein valves") or vein blockage can lead to increases in venous pressure in the legs. As a result of this, the skin can become discolored (reddened acutely or brown chronically). These skin changes are described as stasis dermatitis. See a Vascular Surgeon to confirm the diagnosis and develop a treatment plan. Read more...

Stasis dermatitis--what is that?

End stage change. Stasis dermatitis is one of the complications, or end stage changes of varicose venous disease and/or chronic venous insufficiency. It represents a brownish, brawny discoloration, and usual thickening, of the skin in the distal calf, in the gaiter distribution (the area just above the medial or lateral ankle). Untreated it can progress to venous stasis ulceration, which can be very hard to treat. Read more...

What do do for stasis dermatitis?

Stasis. The overall mainstay of treatment has always been aimed at lessening the clinical impact of the underlying venous insufficiency, which is typically accomplished with compression therapy. Assessing the patient's peripheral arterial circulation (clinically or with a doppler study) before recommending compression therapy is important. Read more...
Reduce pressure. As dr. Fisher said, the mainstay of treatment for stasis dermatitis is compression. The issue is that venous insufficiency causes venous hypertension which causes inflammation, skin changes, swelling, and pain. Compression reduces the pressure in the short term but what really needs to happen is that the venous insufficiency needs to be corrected. This can be done by seeing a vein specialist. Read more...
Protect. Avoid things that make you break out, soaps & wetness. Wash your hands only when necessary. Wear gloves when needed. Wear clothes made of cotton. Bathe only with a small amount of mild unscented soap, such as dove. Keep the water temperature cool or warm, not hot. Use the medicine your doctor gave you. Use a plain moisturizer daily. Avoid scratching or rubbing the itchy area. Manage stress. Read more...

Can you explain stasis dermatitis?

Stasis. Stasis dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disease that occurs on the lower extremities in patients with chronic venous insufficiency with venous hypertension. Stasis dermatitis typically affects middle-aged and elderly patients. It rarely occurs before the fifth decade of life, except in patients with acquired venous insufficiency due to surgery, trauma, or thrombosis. Read more...

Who is at risk of stasis dermatitis?

Stasis derm. Stasis dermatitis is a common inflammatory skin disease that occurs on the lower extremities in patients with chronic venous insufficiency with venous hypertension. Stasis dermatitis typically affects middle-aged and elderly patients. It rarely occurs before the fifth decade of life, except in patients with acquired venous insufficiency due to surgery, trauma, or thrombosis. Read more...

I am looking for a solution for stasis dermatitis?

Stasis. Although extensive work has been completed in the study of treatment of venous ulcers, no large, well-controlled trials examine the treatment of stasis dermatitis. The overall mainstay of treatment has always been aimed at lessening the clinical impact of the underlying venous insufficiency, which is typically accomplished with compression therapy. Read more...

How do different medications treat stasis dermatitis?

Seborrheic derm. Ketoconazole is found in shampoos, foams, gels and creams. It's available in over-the-counter products in a 1 percent concentration and prescription products at a 2 percent strength. Some studies show that the 2 percent strength may be more effective. In a small percentage of people, ketoconazole can cause irritation, itching and burning. Prescription promiseb is very effective for seborrheic derm. Read more...