Question about vitreous detachment? Is there treatment for pvd?

No. New or worse floaters and/or flashing lights in your vision can be a pvd; however, there may also be a retinal tear or retinal detachment. So one must have an urgent dilated retinal exam to rule out the more serious complications. Vitrectomy can be done to remove eye floaters from a pvd, but this is usually too invasive a procedure for this condition.
No. There is no treatment for simple vitreous floaters. Please see your eye doctor for further information and have a nice day!

Related Questions

Does vitreous degeneration always lead to a posterior vitreous detachment (pvd) or pvd may not happen altogether in presence of vitreous degeneration?

PVD. Vitreous degeneration almost always leads to a pvd. Most pvds are benign, but a few may lead to a retinal tear or detachment...So they should be seen by your local eye doctor. Read more...

Ret tear ruled out by my doc, see sparkling stars 24/7, hv floaters too, he said pvd full process not yet started but there is vitreous detachment, means?

PVD. The vitreous jelly in the posterior chamber of the eye can detach from the retina, usually without incident. Rarely, a retinal tear and retinal detachment can occur. The mechanical tugging of connective tissue of the vitreous on the retina makes the patient see flashes of light. As the vitreous separates from the retina, the connective tissue can float in front of your visual axis as "floaters.". Read more...
PVD is not a tear. A PVD or posterior vitreous detachment is a natural consequence of aging. When it occurs in someone suddenly and there are new floaters or flashes of light, we recommend a dilated exam of the retina. It is not because the floaters or flashes are dangerous, but because the PVD may also occur with retinal tears which can lead to retinal detachment, but it is possible to have PVD and no tear. Read more...

Can a 'complete' posterior vitreous detachment (pvd) be sometimes not associated with flashes of light at all, and have symptoms of only floaters?

yes. The flashing lights (photopsias) are due to light attachments between the vitreous edge and the underlying retina as it transitions to liquid. Mostly there are no such connections, therefore no light flashes. This is in fact the case with most people. Read more...
Absolutely. Many patients do not notice any symptoms of the pvd. Others note floaters and some note flashes. The point is that you should get an exam if you notice such symptoms. Remember that a posterior vitreous detachment is the culmination a long natural process. Read more...

Doc ruled out retinal tear, said full pvd yet to start but there's vitreous detachment (my floaters), what is diff betwn full pvd n vitreous detachment?

Synonymous. A "full" PVD and a vitreous detachment are the same thing, albeit a "full" one probably was meant to tell you that the posterior vitreous has completely detached from the posterior part of your eye. The vitreos humor, as we age, begins to separate from the posterior of the eye, generally without compromise to the retina or blood vessels. This takes awhile to complete itself (weeks to months). Read more...
See below. A partial vitreous detachment occurs before a full PVD does. Once the vitreous separates from the optic nerve and macula, it is considered a pvd. Read more...
Same thing. A PVD is a posterior vitreous detachment. Vitreous detachment can be partial or complete, but it is nearly impossible to tell on examination. Thus, as long as there are symptoms of flashes, it is usually assumed that the vitreous detachment is still progressing. Floaters occur and persist with or without progression. Read more...

Why do post-cataract surgery retinal detachments occur? Is there some retinal pulling involved from posterior vitreous detachment (pvd)?

Destabilization. The natural lens and its supports stabilize the front of the eye and vitreous. Removal of the thick natural lens and substitution with a thin artificial lens, increases the chance for the vitreous to move in ways that can destabilize the attachments of the vitreous over the retina. If there are weak places, this can increase the chance of detachment, even in the best of cataract surgeries. Read more...
Uncommon. Retinal detachment after modern uncomplicated cataract surgery is rare. It is not related the the phenomenon of pvd. It is suspected that manipulation of instruments in the eye and the forces they generate can cause an already weakened or predisposed retina to detach during the post operative period. Read more...

If posterior vitreous detachment is caused by inflammation, is there any way of reducing this inflammation? I am 44 and have pvd in one eye already.

No. The vitreous starts out attached to the retina. Over the years, the vitreous changes, shrinking a bit, similar to the way a jello dessert shrinks and pulls away from the edge of a bowl over time. At some point in life, the vitreous may peel away from the retina. Read more...