Glaucoma - is there any way to naturally decrease intraocular pressure?

Exercise. Exercise is the only natural way that i know of that is supported by research.
No. Lowering the pressure requires conventional pharmacologic drops or surgery. No natural remedies are known to lower the pressure except for in some marijuana.

Related Questions

What else causes glaucoma besides the intraocular pressure?

That's all. Glaucoma is a problem in which the internal eye pressure exceeds the resistance of the components at the back of the eye. Causes are inheritance, trauma, eye anatomy, aging but in all cases it is the elevation of the pressure which is the problem. Read more...
Great question . We know high IOP is the biggest risk factor, but other than that, genetics, aging, certain ethnicity (African American, Latino, Asian), thin corneas, high myopia, migraine, raynauds, systemic hyper- or hypotension, diabetes, chronic corticosteroids, eye injury, inflammation, & probably many more (yet to be determined) factors. Early detection w/ a comprehensive eye examination beginning under 40. Read more...

Glaucoma/intraocular pressure control, how can this be done?

Medication. Medication, usually in drop form is required to lower the iop in an eye, either by decreasing aqueous production, increasing utfloe, or both. Laser and scalpel procedures to lower iop increase aqueous outflow and are usually done when medical herapy fails. Read more...
Many treatments. Your Eye physician determines which treatment would seem most appropriate for lowering intraocular pressure in your eye. This determination is based on disease severity, health factors& desired target range of intraocular pressure. Treatment may range from eye drops (1 or more types), oral medication (rare), laser, to incisional glaucoma surgery. Most often, 1 or more of these treatments will work. Read more...

So is 9mmhg a normal intraocular pressure for a glaucoma patient?

Terrific. The goal of treatment in glaucoma is to get the pressure to a level lower than that which will cause eye damage. In almost all cases, achieving a pressure level of 9 would be considered terrific and vision saving. Normal is a range but with the same issue - preserving vision. Read more...
Perhaps. Your IOP seems quite acceptable as long as your treating Eye MD has determined where your target range of IOP should be to protect your optic nerve from progressive damage. The IOP has to be calibrated according to your corneal thickness measurement. For thin corneas, your measured IOP would seem low, but the calibrated would be higher. Your Eye MD is aware of this. . Read more...
No. Most but not all glaucoma patients develop glaucoma due to a pressure greater than 21. A target pressure of 9 in a glaucoma patient is difficult to achieve even with medication or surgery. However, it is the goal to achieve in a patient with advanced glaucoma. Read more...

Ok to take an SSRI (Paxil (paroxetine) 20 mg) with history of elevated intraocular pressure and 'glaucoma suspect' status? Thanks

Best ask Eye Dr. The provider assessing your eye issues is the best by far to ask about this. It's very good that you are thinking of it before doing it. We wish more folks would! With so many on SSRIs now, they must have had experience with the impact on such eye issues. Good luck w/ finding the best views on this. Read more...

In davinci hysterectomy with glaucoma what is the safest degree of tilt in the Trendelenburg position to eliminate rise in intraocular pressure.

No exact number. There is not an agreed upon number. Each case should be reviewed on a case by case basis. Your Gyn surgeon may want to send you for preop clearance by your eye doctor to determine if you are a candidate for Robotic surgery. Eye injury from trendelenberg is rare but it can occur. Your gyn surgeon will also need to determine if your case can be done robotically if steep trendelenberg is not approved. Read more...

What are the specifics of cataract surgery in a patient with treatment-resistant high intraocular pressure due to glaucoma? I am a 43-year-old businessman. I was diagnosed with open-angle glaucoma and cataract in span of just two years. My treatment consi

In . In many glaucoma patients, cataract surgery is performed the same way as it is performed in non-glaucomatous patients. Depending on your severity, the surgeon may use some special techniques to make sure your pressure does not go up too high during or after the surgery. In a small group of patients who are not being well controlled on glaucoma drops, a combined cataract surgery along with a glaucoma surgery (tube shunt or trabeculectomy) can be performed at the same time. Your doctor will be able to best answer whether you will need a single cataract surgery or a combined procedure. Read more...
Glaucoma. Your intraocular pressure needs to be treated and stable prior to cataract surgery. For open angle glaucoma, this may include topical and/or oral medications and laser therapy. Once stable, cataract surgery may be performed as long as your pressure is monitored closely with repeated pressure checks over the first few hours. Read more...
May help. Typical cataracts and glaucoma would be treated independently of each other. About 25-35% of the time cataract surgery can also result in lower pressures in the eye. You should consider cataract surgery if it is affecting you activities of daily living. There are many treatments for glaucoma, and with today's medications and lasers it can be controlled in 95 plus percent of the population. Read more...

How effective is medical marijuana as a glaucoma treatment? I'm curious if medical marijuana can reduce intraocular pressure. Some of the drugs my doctor has prescribed for my glaucoma haven't worked that well. Is medical marijuana a good glaucoma treatme

Medical . Medical marijuana is becoming available in some states. I think the unknown is what "dose" is effective and how often the patient need to "take" it. It would be better to rely on more standard therapy. If eyedrops do not control the pressure then laser therapy is available. Read more...
No. It is the active ingredient of marijuana, thc, that lowers the pressure in the eye. In order for a glaucoma medication to be effective, it must lower the pressure all of the time. So for marijuana to be effective, you would have to high all of the time, even when asleep. Read more...