Is atrial septal defect considered to be a heart disease?

Yes and no. ASD is considered a congenital heart defect(present at birth). Failure to receive corrective treatment during childhood can lead to secondary heart conditions including rhythm disturbances, or heart dysfunction. It is more a matter of how you define the term.

Related Questions

Is atrial septal defect considered a heart disease?

No. An ASD is a structural malformation of the heart that occurs when the normal sequence of events closing the atrial septum does not finish its work. While an untreated defect may result in a heart related problem (rhythm defect or congestive failure) the defect just makes you more vulnerable to a heart condition. Read more...
Yes. Even though "disease" may carry a connotation of "infection" in every day language, in medicine it means that there is some pathology or abnormality. Read more...
Yes. In medicine, there's "normal" and there's "disease". Since it isn't normal, by definition, it's a disease. We tend to think of disease as something you "catch" but congenital abnormalities are also diseases. Perhaps you're wondering if it's serious? Depends on size. Some are, some aren't. Read more...
Congenital defect. Asd's are congenital heart defects wherein blood is shunted from the left atrium (oxygenated) to the right atrium (deoxygenated) circulations. When this shunt is significant (shunt ratio greater than 1.8) or if there are symptoms of dyspnea or right sided pressure/volume overload (pulmonary hypertension), the asd's should be corrected either surgically or by catheterization techniques. Read more...

Is it difficult to have a heart procedure to fix an atrial septal defect?

2 options available. An atrial septal defect (ASD) can be closed in 2 ways. One is through open heart surgery, which is now mainly used if the ASD is extremely large or in an unusual location. However, many people now have their ASD closed through a catheter placed in a leg vein, which is less invasive and avoids bypass and a chest incision. These options should be discussed with your personal cardiologist. Read more...
No. In kids it is like a cardiac cath and percutaneous. That same approach is being done in some adults. If very large, may require surgery with excellent long term results. Read more...