Does using marijuana increase the risk of aortic dissection if you have a widened aorta?

No. Not really , but other drugs that can increase the blood pressure like Cocaine or amphetamine can do that . These drugs are used together.
Maybe not. I am not sure of the association between cannabis and aortic dissection. Have you asked your personal physician why your aorta is widened and if that widening can lead to dissection? I guess if it were me, i might want to minimize any potential risk and would consider stopping the cannabis. Good luck.

Related Questions

Do all types of marphan and ehlers-danlos syndrome increase risk of aortic dissection?

No. There are different types and different variation. Not all lead to dissection. You need to discuss this with your physician if this is you. Marfan and ehlers danlos are different diagnoses and cause different clincial manifestations. Read more...
No. Arterial/aortic disease can be seen in marfan syndrome and type 4 ehler danlos or what is called vascular type. Read more...

How do I know if I'm at increased risk for an aortic dissection?

Certain conditions. Certain conditions greatly increase the chances of developing an aortic dissection. These include connective tissue disorders (marfan syndrome, ehlers danlos, etc). Aortic valve problems and recent procedures that involve the aorta such as cardiac catheterization also increase your risk. Finally, if someone in your family has had an aortic dissection, you and other family members are at high risk. Read more...
BP, age, Marfan's. Chronically untreated elevated blood pressure, advanced age, and marfan's syndrome (very long extremities, for your torso size). This is a rare condition to begin with. Have your physician listen for "abdominal bruit", "carotid bruit", and pursue with ultrasound if these exist and/or if large "pulsatile" mass is noted in the abdomen. Read more...

So you don't see a an aortic dissection on an MRI of the aorta? I made one without injection but the aorta was very clear and bright white with lines.

Misunderstood. You misunderstand me. I didn't say you can't see the aorta on MRI. I said CT is the test of choice. The reason: aortic dissection is an emergency and every minute counts. CT can be done in 2 minutes. MRI takes 40 minutes. Read more...

Can you have Marfan's without aortic dissection? I am 28 and been pregnant 3 times with no changes to aorta.

Yes, but... Marfan's disease is a common cause of thoracic aortic dissection and aneurysm formation. It's a collagen vascular disease, but there are variance in its expressions, from mild to severe. Yet pregnancy is a dangerous state as dissections can occur spontaneously, rapidly, fatally. Echocardiograms to assess the aortic root every 8 weeks during pregnancy alert the OB md of any issues. Be safe... Read more...
Yes. You can have marfans syndrome and go through life without any aortic issues. But you should always be aware that your chance of having an aortic issues ie aneurysm or dissection, will always be higher then the rest of the population. Read more...

How do I know if I have a possible aortic dissection?

Severe chest pain. Aortic dissection is heralded by severe chest pain, often radiating from the front of the chest through the chest and into the back, often described as "tearing" or "ripping". If you suspect it, it's a medical emergency and every minute counts. It would be quite rare in your age group unless you have marfan's syndrome. Read more...

How can I tell if my symptoms are an aortic dissection or aneurism?

Pain. Aortic dissections in the acute stage (less than 3 weeks old) are classically described as a "tearing chest pain that radiates to the back" when they occur in the chest, which is their most common location. Aortic aneurysms are generally asymptomatic, but can cause abdominal or back pain, depending on their location. Read more...

Can aortic dissection be detected using echocardiogram?

Transthoracic. echo good for ascending aortic aneuryms, but transesophageal echo is better, can be as good as a CT or MRI scan for ascending/descending aortic aneurysms. Read more...