I have rheumatic heart disease and some venous insufficiency; are there single drugs that treat both?

2:1 Drug Rx. These are two different disease processes. Venous insufficiency is treated most often without medication but with compression. With your ra, you may feel uncomfortable with the compression that may require some compromise (a palliative approach) between yourself and your clinician.

Related Questions

What medicine should I take to treat erectile dysfunction if I have rheumatic heart disease?

All Fine. I usually prescribe Cialis for high potency, low side effects, and very long duration of action (it improves penile blood flow for ~36hrs. This means you can have several erections over that time, not a continuous erection for the whole 36 hours). It costs the same as the others, and less if 5mg will do and you get a monthly pack of 30. If you have a rhythm problem, avoid levitra (vardenafil). Read more...
It depends. Upon the cause. If no medical cause is present, any of the three products (viagra, levitra, (vardenafil) cialis) would probably work. Be sure to get clearance from your doctor re: your cardiac health and any medications you may be receiving. Read more...

Rheumatic heart disease, what does this involve and how is it treated?

See details. It depends on the specific heart valve or area or the heart involved and the severity of that involvement. The treatment varies from observation to medications to valve replacement. Read more...
Serious. Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory disease that can develop as a complication of inadequately treated strep throat. It can damage the heart valves and the heart muscle. It is treated with bed rest, antibiotics, aspirin, and, rarely, steroids. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/rheumatic-fever/ds00250. Read more...

I have rheumatic heart disease with mild mitral regurgitation. Can I have a baby?

Probably. If your degree of mitral valve regurgitation is mild, your heart is not enlarged and "squeezes" well you should have no problem. You should nevertheless consult with your cardiologist and ob/gyn to coordinate care. Read more...
Probably. Only a competent obstetrician can advise you as to what your options are. Read more...

Is it safe to have a gall bladder surgery if you have rheumatic heart disease?

Yes. Depending on the degree of damage to the heart the surgeon could choose to give you some antibiotics during the surgery....But generally surgery is not contraindicated. Read more...
It depends. Rheumatic heart disease can range from mild to severe. It is not so much the cause of heart disease as it is the severity that increases the risk of surgery. A complete cardiac assessment should be performed prior to elective surgery. Read more...

Why do I have rheumatic heart disease at the age of 40?

Earlier exposure. Rheumatic heart disesase occurs after scarring develops longterm after previous rheumatic fever (usually years to decades before). Rf is caused by a strep infection that infiltrates the heart muscle causing a cascade of inflammation (pancarditis) throughout the muscle and valves. Years later the valve inflammation results in tethering and scarring of the valves which leads to obstruction/regurg. Read more...
Rheumatic fever. One (or often more) episodes of rheumatic fever in childhood can damage one or more heart valves resulting in rheumatic heart disease as an adult. Read more...

What is the cause of rheumatic heart disease and heart murmurs?

Rheumatic heart dise. Rheumatic fever affects the heart muscle leave sometimes permanent damage to the valves especially mitral, aortic and tricuspid valves. Any affection of the valve can produce murmur due to the flow of blood. Read more...
Autoantibodies. Rheumatic heart disease is one of the complications of an untreated strep infection.A month or more after the infection, the body has made antibodies that mistale the tissue of the heart for the germ they were designed to fight.Over time thease antibodies cause inflamation of the heart and can injure the valves. After the acute phase is past, you have a weaker heart with leaky valves and murmurs. Read more...

I has rheumatic heart disease and undergone valvuloplasty in 2009.but now (in 2014) restenosis is taking place? Why is it happening? What should we do?

Not uncommon. Although you are fairly young to have developed rheumatic mitral valve (MV) disease. Restonosis is not uncommon with rheumatic MV after valvuloplasty. If the valve still appears amenable to valvuloplasty by echocardiogram it can be re-attempted. However, if that's not an option your only other choice is a valve replacement. Best of luck. . Read more...