I have severe peripheral vascular disease. My dr is trying his best to prevent having to amputate. Any new therapies?

Stem cell therapy. The latest developments in treatment of pad is the use of stem cells to stimulate the development of collateral vessels. This is experimental at this time. Currently there is a study that you may qualify for if there are no other surgical or endovascular options for you. Initial, small studies were promising for limb salvage.
Stents. I do not know what you have tried but you should have done the following: stop smoking, structured daily walking routine, take a statin (such as lipitor), take an aspirin, keep your diabetes under tight control, see a vascular surgeon who can provide treatments like stents or possibly a bypass to improve the blood flow in your legs.

Related Questions

My age is 19. I'm having severe bilateral peripheral vascular disease and my left big toe is amputated. Can it be cured fully without any problems?

More info needed... Peripheral vascular disease is unusual in someone your age. Depending on the cause, it is very possible that your condition could be managed to help minimize or slow progression. Depending on the vessels involved, there may be treatment available to improve your circulation. A true "cure" is unlikely.

How can peripheral vascular disease affect cardiac output?

PVD. The increased outflow resistance can decrease it somewhat but complex interplay of factors.
Obstruction. The peripheral vessels are atherosclerotic-hardened and frequently partially blocked. The heart is pumping into a stiff set of pipes. Hypertension, high resistance have some effect. Many folks with PVD also have coronary disease. Up to 30-40%.

Which antiplatelet agents help peripheral vascular disease?

Aspirin / Plavix (clopidogrel) Aspirin and Plavix (clopidogrel) are the most commonly used anti-platelet agents.
COMPLEX ANSWER. Antiplatelet medications are important in the management of pad. Types of agents depend on how bad your disease is and other areas affected, such as coronary arteries or carotid arteries. These meds are very important if you have stents or bypasses. Please develope a gameplan with your doctor.

How can peripheral vascular disease affect cardiac output?

Obstruction. The peripheral vessels are atherosclerotic-hardened and frequently partially blocked. The heart is pumping into a stiff set of pipes. Hypertension, high resistance have some effect. Many folks with PVD also have coronary disease. Up to 30-40%.
It doesn't directly. Peripheral vascular disease (PVD) is a general term for narrowing of the arteries in the body exclusive of those associated with your heart (those are called the coronary arteries). Pvd is, however, considered a marker for heart disease and coronary artery disease and, if severe enough, can cause issues with the heart that can affect its output.

Could a doctor here tell me what is a peripheral vascular disease?

Peripheral. Peripheral artery disease, or "pad" is a blood vessel condition that is usually the result of progressive plaque build-up within the walls of arteries than leads to blockage of blood flow. It can cause leg pain when walking, usually in the calves, pain at rest in the foot or leg, leg numbness or tingling, coldness or discoloration of the skin, foot or leg ulcers, gangrene, poor healing of wounds.