What do diabetic ulcers on somebody's feet look like?

Varied. Diabetic ulcers are about as varied as rashes. They can begin under a thick nail as drainage. They can be a simple cut on the foot or scab. Or they can be a large open wound with infection. They also compass gangrene that appears as black or sometimes grayish/purplish discoloration to the toe. Have it checked out by a podiatrist immediately! they can diagnose and treat, or help prevent them.
Ulcers. Ulcers take on many forms. You will see an open wound of some sort. Some may be covered with callus or thick scabs that need to be removed.
See Image. This image is an example of what (and commonly where) diabetic wounds occur. They generally have a thick rim of callus and are most usual on weightbearing surfaces.
Diabetic Foot Ulcer. Any 'blemish' in the foot in a diabetic patient requires immediate attention by a health care professional. Do not delay! contact you primary care physician, podiatrist, or local wound care center as soon as possible.
Some may. Some may look similar if they are in the same location with similar depths.
Broken skin . People with diabetes often develop foot ulcers which are open sores on the feet that go through the skin. This is a a serious complication and can lead to serious consequences such as amputation. If your not sure better to be safe then sorry and see a professional.
Many different looks. Red, thin skin, open area, scaly, some callus tissue..

Related Questions

What is diabetic ulcers on the feet look like?

Deep and Moist. Diabetic ulcers are usually deep and moist. Usually located at pressure points on the bottom of the foot. If infected they will drain smelly fluid. These are very serious and you should see a physician. Read more...
Many Possibilities. A diabetic ulcer occurs when there is loss of sensation below the ankles (neuropathy). This allows your feet to become injured without you knowing. There is really no specific appearance but rather, they simply occur as cracks in the skin, cracks in callus that result in skin tears below, and other wounds in that area resulting from loss of tissue. Healing occurs when you stay off the injured area. Read more...
Have it evaluated. A diabetic foot ulcer is best diagnosed with a physical exam. Your physician will ask you to remove your shoes in order to inspect your feet. They will look for redness, calluses, bruising, blistering, swelling, and for open sores. Sometimes the ulcer may be hidden and will be discovered following the debridement of calluses or the deroofing of blisters. Read more...

How can I tell what do diabetic ulcers on the feet look like?

Dfu. Diabetic foot ulcers usually appear on the sole of the feet, usually over bony prominences. They occur because the diabetic patient cannot feel normal sensations on the feet, and because the diabetic patient is prone to multiple other conditions such as poor blood flow and bone abnormalities. A poorly controlled diabetic also has healing and repair challenges. Any questions, seek help as soon as p. Read more...

My mom has these sores that look like diabetic ulcers on her feet, but she's not a diabetic. What could they be?

Ulcerations. There are many types of ulcerations and a patient does not have to be diabetic to develop. The most common types are diabetic and vascular related. If you mom has no history of a diabetes, she still needs to be evaluated. See a foot specialist or a wound care specialist for a complete workup before other issues ensue, such as infection. Read more...
More info needed. To receive an answer that will be more helpful, you need to give more information...Your health status, any problems such as gout, diabetes or blood pressure concerns. You should state how long it has been a problem and what you do to make it feel better. Also tells us what it looks like. Is it discolored, swollen or point tender. The more you tell the better the answer. Read more...
Ulcers. People with diabetes develop foot ulcers which are open sores on the feet that go through the skin but you don't have to be a diabetic to have open sores. Pressure, loss of sensation and trauma can all lead to ulcers. All of these can lead to serious complication and can themselves result in serious consequences such as amputation. She needs to be checked by a professional to resolve the issue. Read more...
Depends. There are many different types of sores. Your mother could possibly be an undiagnosed diabetic. Have the sores evaluated. As long as they are healing the type of wound does not matter so much. Read more...
Many possibilities. Some causes of foot ulcer include trauma, poor arterial or venous circulation, and skin cancer. Read more...