What is the best way to reverse deep vein thrombosis?

Thrombolysis. Large DVT can be treated with chemicals to dissolve the clot. Used in combination with suction type devices, most of the clot can be removed. There are limitation to using this medication known as tpa, (alteplase) and there is always risk of bleeding when using it. Surgery to remove vein clots is rarely done anymore.

Related Questions

What is the best way to fully recover from deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. I used to run marathons, but my breath is just not the same.?

Steadily train. A pulmonary embolism is kind of like a heart attack of the lung. A portion of the lung has been damaged and the remaining alveoli and blood circulation have to pick up the slack. As you train, and steadily increase your activity, you will develop greater lung capacity and endurance. Though you may not return to your previous capability, it could be possible with continued effort.. Read more...
See your lung doctor. Most patient who recover from a DVT or pe, recover fully. So if you are having residual exercise complaints it may mean that the clots did not fully dissolve or that the clots cause permanent lung damage. You needa full evaluation including ekg, echocardiogram, ventilation perusion scan and pulmonary function studies. Read more...
You might have PAH. You should take your blood thinner medications as prescribed for the duration recommended. You might need to be evaluated for pulmonary arterial hypertension (pah which can result from a prior pulmonary embolism. This results in increased blood pressure in your lung circulation and can cause strain on the right heart along with shortness of breath. Your doctor may recommend an echocardiogram. Read more...

What's considered the best way to help prevent me from getting deep vein thrombosis or blood clots in the legs when I get older?

Routine Activity. Routine exercise and activity will help to prevent stasis of the blood in the leg veins, one of the predisposing factors for dvt. See your primary doctor for routine yearly exam, and if you have a family history or risk factor history, further testing may be recommended. Varicose veins, swelling can be helpful external signs of venous insufficiency which can be associated with dvt. Read more...
Mobilize. Reduce risk factors walk or proper exercize weight to ideal. Ask your pcp about any clotting disorders. Probably avoid birth control meds. Read more...

What are the best drugs to avoid deep vein thrombosis?

Keep moving. There are few drugs that actually prevent dvt. The best thing is to avoid sitting for long periods such as a plane ride or car ride without moving. Stop the car and walk around every 2 hours or so. Get up in an airplane and move around or use the bathroom every few hours. Read more...
Few . Aspirin sometimes but moving around is key. Talk to your physician for more particulars. Read more...
There are many. Aspirin helps some . More potent blood thinner like Coumadin (warfarin) / Pradaxa / elequis ECT are used for higher risk individuals, but they also have higher risk of bleeding . Please discuss your concerns with your doctor. Read more...
Dvt. There are no drugs used to avoid any deep vein thrombosis. Perhaps a baby aspirin prior to airplane trip may be of benefit, however at age 36 I would not recommend that this be use on a daily basis. The most important protector against deep vein thrombosis is being active, drinking plenty of fluids daily, and not sitting for prolonged periods of time. Read more...

Which are the best drugs to avoid getting deep vein thrombosis?

Avoid risk factors. Avoid sitting or not moving for long time, walking is good , take medicine like Heparin sq , Lovenox (enoxaparin) sq , Fragmin .. All these are effective .. Lovenox (enoxaparin) showed a little bit better protection especially in cancer patients. Read more...
Hormones. Generally, the drugs which are most likely to have deep vein thrombosis as a side effect would probably be the hormones that are found in birth control pills. This includes forms of estrogen and progesterone. The higher the amount of either one, the higher your risk of having a clot. If you are sedentary, over age 45, smoke, have certain chronic diseases, or are over weight. Your risk is higher. Read more...

How best to treat deep vein thrombosis of the lower leg?

Blood thinners. It depends, to some extent, on where the clot is. It is possible to have a deep vein thrombosis that is so far down the leg, is so small, and is in such a small vein that we might treat it with anti-inflammatory medicines and compression stockings. If the clot is in a larger vein and is bigger, then we treat those with blood thinners for a minimum of 3 months and use compression stockings too. Read more...
Anticoagulation . Tibial vein DVT has been a controversial subject. Current recommendations call for systemic anticoagulation for 3 months (often started with Lovenox (enoxaparin) and bridged onto coumadin). At three months a repeat ultrasound is done to determine if another 3 months would be appropriate due to persistent clot. Don't forget the compression stockings to avoid post phlebitis syndrome. Read more...
Broad topic. Anticoagulation still the baseline therapy for an acute DVT. In recent years, we have been more aggressive in selected cases to intervene with pharmacomechanical treatments (e.g. ANGIOJET and t-PA) to achieve more rapid clearance and preserve valve function. This is with the intent to reduce the incidence of post-phlebtic syndrome. Duration of anticoagulation depends on many factors. Read more...

How can I best prevent pulmonary embolism if I had a deep vein thrombosis?

Need to discuss. This with your doctor. You need to be on blood thinner for at least 6 months. Also have your blood checked to see if it is too thick. Some patients also need an ivc filter ( see radiologyinfo.Org). Read more...
See below. Follow your doctor's advice and take your blood thinner as prescribed. To prevent further episodes, eliminate risk factors such as smoking, medicines that may predispose to clots (ask your doctor), premedicate with blood thinner before long flights, travel or other immobility, and if you are a woman and plan to get pregnant, make sure you consult high-risk doctors. Read more...

What can I do to best prevent pulmonary embolism if I have a deep vein thrombosis?

Treatment DVT. The usual treatment for DVT is anticoagulation with Coumadin or warfarin. The medicine prolongs the time it takes for the blood to clot and reduces the formation of new vein clots or thrombi. Clots that are already in the deep veins are unlikely to travel to the lungs as they adhere to the vein wall after a few days. If anticoagulation cannot be used a vena cava filter may be indicated. Read more...
Anticoagulation. If unable to tolerate anticoagulation then a filter will be placed in your vena cava. Read more...
Anticoagulation. As stated anticoagulation of the blood is the treatment for DVT and is effective in preventing pulmonary emboli. Ivc filters should not be thought of as the treatment for dvt. They are useful for patients that can not be anticoagulated due to other diseases. Filters are effective at trapping large embli but do not treat the DVT and do not trap smaller emboli. Read more...

What is deep vein thrombosis?

A blood clot. A DVT is a blood clot ( thrombus) which has formed in the deep vein of usually the leg. It may involve the lower, upper or entire leg. Less frequently it involves the upper extremity. The other kind of clotting is superficial phlebitis which occurs in the veins just under the skin. If either is suspected one should seek immediate medical attention. Read more...
A blood clot. As dr. Toppin said, it is a blood clot in a deep vein. You can also get clots in superficial veins (svt). It used to be felt that superficial phlebitis (svt) was essentially a benign condition that was a painful nuisance. We now know that svt can be associated with deep vein thrombosis about 25% of the time. If you have an svt, it is important to get medical attention, as the others have said. Read more...
Deep blood clot. Deep venous thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot involving a deep vein of the venous system of the body. It most commonly involves leg veins, although can also occur in pelvic veins, arm veins, or other deep veins of the body. This can be dangerous as the clot can embolize to the heart or lungs and lead to sudden death from pulmonary embolism (PE). Seek immediate vascular doctor opinion for DVT. Read more...
There are roughly. 3 layers of veins; barely under the skin that you can often see, a little deeper in the skin that you often can't see, and under muscles. Particular veins under the muscles are called "deep veins". Deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a deep vein clot. Deep veins are the main pathway for vein blood to flow and are also a pretty straight shot to the lungs, so clots there can be especially dangerous. Read more...

What causes a deep vein thrombosis?

Many factors. Patients with a hereditary condition, called venous insufficiency have a valvular condition that allows blood to pool while standing or sitting, decreased return to heart when not lying down. Can lead to inflammation due to decreased blood flow through the vein, damage to vein and blood clotting. Other factors blood clotting disorder, malignancy, recent surgery, hx dvt, pregnancy, hrt, infection. Read more...
Virchow's Triad. The causes of DVT center on 3 important factors which can act alone or together known as virchow's triad. The 3 factors are: 1. Stasis (sluggish flow in the veins) — limited mobility or venous insufficiency. 2. Injury to the vein — trauma, IV inserts, surgery, circulating toxins and bacteria. 3. Hypercoagulable states- from a genetic predisposition or non-genetic such as smoking, cancers, etc. Read more...