5 doctors weighed in:
What does frontoparietal arteriovenous malformation (avm) mean; is it a very bad deal?
5 doctors weighed in

Dr. William Singer
Pediatrics - Neurology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Abnormal vessels
An arteriovenous malformation is an abnormal tangle of blood vessels where blood goes directly from arteries to veins without going through capillaries.
As a result it is a high blood flow area. there is a risk of rupture of the AVM. There are several ways that these can be managed. You should speak to a neurologist or Neurosurgeon who may refer you to a neuroradiologist for non surgical trea

In brief: Abnormal vessels
An arteriovenous malformation is an abnormal tangle of blood vessels where blood goes directly from arteries to veins without going through capillaries.
As a result it is a high blood flow area. there is a risk of rupture of the AVM. There are several ways that these can be managed. You should speak to a neurologist or Neurosurgeon who may refer you to a neuroradiologist for non surgical trea
Dr. William Singer
Dr. William Singer
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Dr. Joseph Gemmete
Radiology - Interventional
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Depends
Treatment options include radiation, embolization, and surgery.
The rate of rupture for an asymptomatic avm is relatively low less than 2%/yr. If the avm has had a prior hemorrhage would recommend treatment, provided the morbidity and mortality related to treatment is low.

In brief: Depends
Treatment options include radiation, embolization, and surgery.
The rate of rupture for an asymptomatic avm is relatively low less than 2%/yr. If the avm has had a prior hemorrhage would recommend treatment, provided the morbidity and mortality related to treatment is low.
Dr. Joseph Gemmete
Dr. Joseph Gemmete
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Dr. Seth Zeidman
Neurosurgery
In brief: Depends
It can be deadly serious or incidental - depending on the type and location.
You should see a neurosurgeon to determine which one you have and what it needs for treatment.

In brief: Depends
It can be deadly serious or incidental - depending on the type and location.
You should see a neurosurgeon to determine which one you have and what it needs for treatment.
Dr. Seth Zeidman
Dr. Seth Zeidman
Thank
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