How to care for an aortic stenosis patient at home while they await surgery?

Care. Depending on the degree of stenosis, patients should avoid exertion that can cause passing out. Best is to do light activities and not to exercise (more than casual walking). Control fluid and salt intake to avoid fluid overload. Use meds judiciously to prevent fluid overload or passing out due to low blood pressure. Get the surgery done soon!

Related Questions

Surgery for valve replacement in someone with aortic stenosis? What are the different ways?

Many. Depending on the patient risk and other comorbidities and need for concomitant surgery (other valve, bypass), one can have mini aortic valve replacement (small incision 6 cm, short hospital stay), regular valve surgery (classic incision), or percutaneous valve replacement (tavr, in specialized centers). Your cardiologist should be able to help pick the best one for your particular situation. Read more...
Not many. Best treatment is surgical replacement. It can be performed through a full sternotomy, a partial sternotomy or a small right anterior thoracotomy. The last two approaches are considered minimally invasive. Another option is transcatheter aortic valve replacement, only inoperable and high risk patients are candidates. Also balloon valvuloplasty, short term solution, lasts approximately 6 months. Read more...
SAVR AND TAVR. Traditionally, surgical aortic valve replacement was the best method for treating significant aortic stenosis. Some patients, unfortunately, were too ill for the procedure. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (tavr) has proven an excellent alternative for these patients. Talk to your thoracic surgeon and cardiologist to see if you are eligible. Read more...

Surgery for someone with aortic stenosis?

Sometimes. There is surgery for this but is only indicated for a when stenosis becomes bad and your overall condition matters too. Consult your doctor for a surgeons opinion. Read more...

What are some treatments for aortic stenosis surgery?

Multiple. Options for aortic valve surgery today include replacement with full sternotomy or mini- sternotomy, or percutaneous aortic valve replacement, which will likely be the standard of care in another 5- 10 years. Currently, surgery is still the best approach with the longest track record. Read more...

Valve surgery recommended at what point if you have aortic stenosis?

See below. The accepted indications for surgical treatment are syncope (fainting) which may indicate critical narrowing. Chest pain which may be due to poor flow to the coronary arteries which start just beyond the aortic valve and shortness of breath which may be due to congestive heart failure are the two others. Read more...
Aortic stenosis. Surgery when valve area is critical by measurements on echocardiogram or cath or severe with symptoms of chest pain, shortness of breath, or dizziness or blacking out with exercise. Read more...

Valve surgery recommended for you at what point, if you have aortic stenosis?

Symptoms. Symptomatic aortic stenosis or aortic stenosis that has started to affect the heart (enlargement, decrease in ejection fraction) even in the absence of symptoms are indications for surgery. Read more...

What are other ways to treat aortic stenosis besides valve replacement surgery?

Not many. Best treatment is surgical replacement. It can be performed through a full sternotomy, a partial sternotomy or a small right anterior thoracotomy. The last two approaches are considered minimally invasive. Another option is transcatheter aortic valve replacement, only inoperable and high risk patients are candidates. Also balloon valvuloplasty, short term solution, lasts approximately 6 months. Read more...
None. Unfortunately we are yet to find a non-surgical way to halt or reverse aortic stenosis. Current technology however is advancing the placement of new aortic valves through a catheter avoiding having to open the chest. Read more...

Do you know any way to treat aortic stenosis besides valve replacement surgery?

Aortic Valve Tx. This is an excellent question! The treatment of aortic valve stenosis (AS) is multi-factorial and depends on your symptoms, what the valve looks like (morphology-so how many leaflets) and how well it is working (stenosis=blockage vs. leakage). AS can be potentially initially treated in the cath lab with good/excellent results - but AS is a progressive disease so surgery may eventually be needed. Read more...
Transcatheter . There is no medical treatment for aortic stenosis other than replacing the valve by open heart surgery or by transcatheter approach whereby the artificial valve is delivered to the aorta by a catheter through the aorta in the groin (femoral artery) percutaneously. In the US ,the procedure is approved only in patients deemed too risky to undergo open heart surgery. Read more...