6 doctors weighed in:
Surgery for valve replacement in someone with aortic stenosis? What are the different ways?
6 doctors weighed in

Dr. Jon Spiers
Surgery - Thoracic
2 doctors agree
In brief: SAVR AND TAVR
Traditionally, surgical aortic valve replacement was the best method for treating significant aortic stenosis.
Some patients, unfortunately, were too ill for the procedure. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (tavr) has proven an excellent alternative for these patients. Talk to your thoracic surgeon and cardiologist to see if you are eligible.

In brief: SAVR AND TAVR
Traditionally, surgical aortic valve replacement was the best method for treating significant aortic stenosis.
Some patients, unfortunately, were too ill for the procedure. Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (tavr) has proven an excellent alternative for these patients. Talk to your thoracic surgeon and cardiologist to see if you are eligible.
Dr. Jon Spiers
Dr. Jon Spiers
Thank
Dr. Roberto Rodriguez
Surgery - Thoracic
2 doctors agree
In brief: Not many
Best treatment is surgical replacement.
It can be performed through a full sternotomy, a partial sternotomy or a small right anterior thoracotomy. The last two approaches are considered minimally invasive. Another option is transcatheter aortic valve replacement, only inoperable and high risk patients are candidates. Also balloon valvuloplasty, short term solution, lasts approximately 6 months.

In brief: Not many
Best treatment is surgical replacement.
It can be performed through a full sternotomy, a partial sternotomy or a small right anterior thoracotomy. The last two approaches are considered minimally invasive. Another option is transcatheter aortic valve replacement, only inoperable and high risk patients are candidates. Also balloon valvuloplasty, short term solution, lasts approximately 6 months.
Dr. Roberto Rodriguez
Dr. Roberto Rodriguez
Thank
Dr. Liviu Klein
Internal Medicine - Cardiology
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Many
Depending on the patient risk and other comorbidities and need for concomitant surgery (other valve, bypass), one can have mini aortic valve replacement (small incision 6 cm, short hospital stay), regular valve surgery (classic incision), or percutaneous valve replacement (tavr, in specialized centers).
Your cardiologist should be able to help pick the best one for your particular situation.

In brief: Many
Depending on the patient risk and other comorbidities and need for concomitant surgery (other valve, bypass), one can have mini aortic valve replacement (small incision 6 cm, short hospital stay), regular valve surgery (classic incision), or percutaneous valve replacement (tavr, in specialized centers).
Your cardiologist should be able to help pick the best one for your particular situation.
Dr. Liviu Klein
Dr. Liviu Klein
Thank
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