Can you diagnosed abdominal aortic aneurysm with a stethoscope w/o x-ray?

No. Physical exam can tell if there pulsatile mass in the abdomen but can miss a lot of aneurysms. Listening with the stethoscope does not help. You need a screening duplex ultrasound. Plain abdominal x-ray is not very helpful unless to much calcium in the aortic wall can suggest an aneurysm.
Indirectly. The best ways to diagnose an abdominal aortic aneurysm are by ct scan or ultrasound. However, in a thin person, one may palpate a pulsatile mass in the upper mid-abdomen or hear with a stethoscope a bruit, which is turbulent flow within a blood vessel.

Related Questions

Would xray be able to recognize an abdominal aortic aneurysm?

Can X-ray see AAA. Many aaas have a calcified wall making them visible on plain x-rays but since many do not have the calcium, an ultrasound or ct scan would be the test of choice. Read more...
Aneurysm Diagnosis. Although regular x-ray test can occasionally diagnose an aneurysm (if there is calcium buildup in the aneurysm wall), the test is unreliable. The main tests used for diagnosis are either ultrasounds or ct scans. Mri is also useful. The particular test that is best will depend on the location of the aneurysm. Brain aneurysms typically by ct or MRI and other aneurysm often ultrasound initially. Read more...

Would a regular abdominal xray be able to see an abdominal aortic aneurysm?

No, need ultrasound. An abdominal x ray doesn't show blood vessels so it's not used to detect aneurysms. An abdominal ultrasound is usually done to screen for aortic aneurysms. Men who have ever smoked are advised to have an abdominal ultrasound between the ages of 65 and 75. Read more...
Sometimes. Only if walls of the aneurysm are calcified. Ultrasound and ct scan are best ways to image. Read more...
Get an Ultrasound. Plain x-rays use ionizing radiation and can miss many aneurysms - only images the ones that have a lot of calcium in them (many don't have calcium at all). Ultrasound uses sound waves and sees just about every aneurysm so it's the very best screening test! Read more...

Can abdominal aortic aneurysm diagnosed with a sthethoscope exam or you need an ultrasound scan?

Ultrasound is best. Physical exam is unreliable; doctors over diagnose abdominal aneurysms in thin people and underdiagnose them in fatter people on physical exam alone. The best screening test is a duplex ultrasound. In experienced hands, this test has a 99% plus sensitivity and specificity-- meaning it is a very good screening test. Read more...
Diagnose AAA. While some large aneurysms can be felt with your hands on the belly an ultrasound is a much more effective and accurate way to make the diagnosis. Read more...

Would a routine, regular abdominal X-ray be able to detect an abdominal aortic aneurysm?

If calcified. If the wall of the aneurysm is calcified it may be possible to see it on a regular abdominal x-ray especially if a transtable view is obtained. Read more...
Sometimes. If there is enough calcium in the wall of the aneurysm it may be able to be seen on plain x-ray. The best screening method for an aneurysm of the abdominal aorta is an ultrasound. This is non invasive and easy to do. Read more...
Sometimes. Calcified aaa's can be seen on plain films but most would be very poorly seen. Aaa's that are not causing symptoms are most often found when a physician is performing an imaging test, such as an ultrasound or ct scan, for another condition. Sometimes your physician may feel a large pulsing mass in your abdomen on a routine physical examination. Read more...
Get an ultrasound. Ultrasound is a superior test for detecting abdominal aortic aneurysms. It is non-invasive and does not require ionizing radiation (it uses sound waves). If you're a smoker, have copd, high blood pressure, or a have a family member with an aneurysm ask if you should be screened. Abdominal x-ray is not a good test for detecting aneurysms- it relies on detecting calcium and misses many! Read more...

Who should I go to to seek a diagnose for possible abdominal aortic aneurysm?

Vascular laboratory. Most AAA are hard to detect by physical exam unless the patient is fairly thin. Ultrasound is the most common imaging study to screen for aaa. You can be screened for AAA at an icavl certified vascular laboratory, if you have a family history of AAA then you have a higher risk of developing a AAA and should most definitely be screened. If you have an aaa, see a vascular surgeon. Read more...
Who dx AAA? Your primary care doc can arrange for and ultrasound to see if you have an aneurysm. If you don't have a primary care doc go see a vascular surgeon. Read more...
PMD. Initially you should go to your primary doctor. Then if you have an aortic aneurysm, follow-up with a vascular surgeon for advice. Read more...

Isit possible that I have an abdominal aortic aneurysm when I'm only 24 but have sharp pains and pulsing in lower leftabdomen and middle for 3-4 years?

Can't tell. Symptoms aren't peculiar to aneurysm, you need to be seen however if you have had these symptoms for long. History and physical examination would direct further management, like need for imaging studies and what type, good luck. Read more...

My father passed away four months ago of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, I was traumatized, I'm 20, what are the chances of me developing this?

Most of these. Abdominal aortic aneurysms (aaa's) occur in older (over 65) patients with a history of smoking and/or hypertension. If a AAA occurs in someone younger or without typical risk factors then testing for various syndromes and genetic predispositions can be performed. Your doctor can help parse this out. Read more...
AAA killed DAD. 23 F My father passed away four months ago of a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm, i was traumatized, , what are the chances of me developing this? ANS: unless your family has a strong Hx of AAA not very likely. So do family tree and AAA. Much less common in women. Esp if you do not smoke or have HTN. Read more...

Abdominal aortic aneurysm please tell me death rate?

Death rate improves . Abdominal aortic aneurysms have benefitted from improved diagnostics, surgeries, medications, and now stents. Rupture rate goes up when AAA gets larger than 5.5 cm. Survival with little morbidity is now expected. Mortality is less than 5%. Get to your doc for medications and referral to vascular surgery. Read more...
Depends on size. Rupture rates from aaa's less than 4 cm are very small. Risk of rupture at 5-5.5 cm is about 5% per year. The risk goes up quickly from there. For example, 10-20% at 6-7 cm, and 20-40% for 7-8 cm. An intervention is often recommended if the aneurysm grows more than 1 cm per year or it is bigger than 5.5 cm. Data also supports consideration for a lower threshold in women (5 cm) - rupture earlier. Read more...