6 doctors weighed in:
How do you get endometriosis?
6 doctors weighed in

Dr. Alfredo Nieves
Gynecology
3 doctors agree
In brief: Endo
In short we don't know.
There are some theories that suggest that endometriosis occurs because of back bleeding through the fallopian tubes into the pertoneal cavity and the body is not able to digest this blood for which reason endometriosis develops. Most women have retrograde menses but only about 10 percent may get endometriosis due to a faulty immunological system.

In brief: Endo
In short we don't know.
There are some theories that suggest that endometriosis occurs because of back bleeding through the fallopian tubes into the pertoneal cavity and the body is not able to digest this blood for which reason endometriosis develops. Most women have retrograde menses but only about 10 percent may get endometriosis due to a faulty immunological system.
Dr. Alfredo Nieves
Dr. Alfredo Nieves
Thank
Dr. Michael Swor
Obstetrics & Gynecology
In brief: Migrating cells
There are several theories, but based on when, where and how we see it develop, the best theory is that the cells that grow normally in the lining of the uterus, migrate out the tubes and scatter in the pelvic area, and then grow.
Each month they build up and shed just like the menstrual lining. Problems that cause blockage of the menstrual flow, increase the chance of endometriosis.

In brief: Migrating cells
There are several theories, but based on when, where and how we see it develop, the best theory is that the cells that grow normally in the lining of the uterus, migrate out the tubes and scatter in the pelvic area, and then grow.
Each month they build up and shed just like the menstrual lining. Problems that cause blockage of the menstrual flow, increase the chance of endometriosis.
Dr. Michael Swor
Dr. Michael Swor
Thank
3 comments
Dr. Robert Albee
Since Sampson first coined the term “endometriosis” in 1921, extensive research on pathogenesis has been carried out. Despite progress, no single theory has proven sufficient to explain pathogenesis satisfactorily; current concepts hold that multi-factorial immune, hormonal, genetic, environmental and anatomic factors may be responsible. Researchers agree the disease is likely to be polygenic and multifactorial, but the exact pathogenic mechanisms are still unclear. Each theory, singularly, fails to account for all forms of endometriosis, thereby indicating multi-factorial mechanisms. The oldest concept is based on the assumption that endometriosis may arise from metaplasia of peritoneal or ovarian tissue. Another assumption is that substances released by the endometrium are transported by blood and lymph systems to induce endometriosis in various areas of the body. Sampson’s Theory – which assumes the lesions are the result of “seedlings” from the ovaries or reflux menstruation – is widely accepted but fraught with error; not the least of which is the failure to explain why most women have retrograde menses yet only some develop the disease. More recent research links genetic variants to endometriosis, and scientists have identified adult stem cells in several tissues, including the endometrium, with evidence to suggest a role of stem/progenitor cells in development of the disease. Similarly, mesenchymal stem cells are involved in the pathogenesis of the disease and may be the principle source of endometriosis outside of the peritoneal cavity when they differentiate into endometriosis in ectopic locations. With credible evidence defining endometriosis as an epigenetic disorder, future research will elucidate further understanding into this unrelenting, enigmatic disease.
Dr. Michael Swor
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