Can you die from a bone marrow transplant?

Yes. Depends on patient's condition , type of transplant, auto or allo, type of conditioning and subsequent complication. The simple answer is yes ppl can die but we don't do the procedure to let people die , we do it to save them. The question is what is the risk and what is the alternative. We know we can die of driving, but we take the risk.
Yes, The risk depends on whether the transplant is with your own cells or from a donor. With your own cells the risk of transplant related death for most diseases is 2-5% but can be higher depending on the disease and other medical problems of the patient. The risk is generally higher for a donor transplant--typically ~15% for adults with a matched sibling but can be higher with other donors.
Yes, but unlikely. The bone marrow transplant procedure requires that your own diseased bone marrow be totally wiped out. Then when implanted bone marrow cells enter the body they will find a clean space to take up residence. Between removing old marrow and getting tranplant to grow a patient is at risk for severe, possibly fatal infections. This happens rarely.

Related Questions

Is it possible for you die from a bone marrow transplant?

Yes. Early transplant related deaths do occur. The incidence varies with the type of transplant, underlying disease and age of the patient. Read more...
Yes. People can die from the toxicities of a bone marrow or stem cell transplant. The risk is dependent on factors such as the type of donor, the reason for the transplant as well as other medical problems the recipient has. Read more...

What is a bone marrow transplant?

See below. A bone marrow transplant is the replacement of blood forming elements. The transplant is actually done with peripheral blood stem cells, and infused like a blood transfusion. The need for a transplant is because the treatment for certain diseases requires high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy that will destroy one's marrow completely. This then requires replacement with another's marrow. Read more...

Does a bone marrow transplant hurt?

Bone marrow . The actual infusion of the cells does not hurt. The side effects of the chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy that are part of the preparative regimen of the transplant can be unpleasant. This can include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, mouth sores, infections. Read more...

Is a bone marrow transplant painful?

No. A bone marrow or peripheral blood (pb) stem cell transplant (sct) is not painful. There are various "induction" treatments that depend on the type of cancer or disease to "condition" or get rid of the cancer (& normal) cells. A sct then "rescues" the bone marrow by returning self (autologous sct) cells or cells from another (allogeneic sct). The sct itself is similar to a blood infusion. Read more...
Side effects. There are many effects which can be unpleasant like nausea, vomiting, diarrhea amd mouth sores. Depending on how the transplant is done the mouth sores can be severe and painful. There can be abdominal pain or bone pain in some patients. Read more...
Like a transfusion. Bone marrow transplantation is a long drawn out process. The marrow (or blood stem cells) is actually just infused IV like a blood transfusion. That's the easy part. Often high dose chemotherapy or radiation is given ahead of time. If the marrow comes from someone else then long courses of immune suppressive treatments are needed to control an inflammatory reaction called graft vs host disease. . Read more...

How is a bone marrow transplant done?

Let me explain. 1-we have to have a donor who donate that, we do collect the bone marrow from him we call this step (harvesting) 2-we have to transplant this marrow to the recipient (patient receiving the bone marrow). 3-both involve special collecting method and method of delivery , done under anesthesia use some big needles to harvest. Some time require small surgery under anesthesia. Read more...
Simply... Simply put you wipe out your bone marrow with high dose chemotherapy, infuse stem cells from bone marrow, cord or peripheral blood and then wait for them to engraft in your body. Meanwhile being on immunosupressants to helpprevent the new bone marrow from rejecting your own body. Read more...
Marrow or PBSC. Marrow hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) can be collected from the donor with aspiration syringes and long needles. It is done under anesthesia because multiple aspirations are needed. Now we more often collect HSC from the blood thru IVs using an apheresis machine. Much easier for the donor. HSC are infused into the patient through an IV (like a blood transfusion), after chemotherapy. Read more...

How painful is a bone marrow transplant?

Variable. The actual transplant which is the reinfusion of the bone marrow or stem cells is not painful. However there can be side effects to the radiation and/or chemotherapy used to treat the patient before the stem cell infusion. Depending on how the transplant is done those treatments can cause some unpleasant side effects including nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain and mouth sores among other things. Read more...

What is involved in a bone marrow transplant?

Transplant. Now a days it is actually called stem cell transplant. It involves stem cell collection, followed by high dose chemotherapy to wipe bone marrow and then infusion of collected stem cells and then recovery of bone marrow. Read more...
Transplant. Also called as stem cell transplant involve stem cell collection from patient or donor, followed by high dose chemotherapy to wipe out marrow and then stem cell infusion back to patient. Finally bone marrow recovery and response to stem cell transplant. Read more...

What happens during a bone marrow transplant?

Replace bone marrow. A bmt or stem cell transplant replaces a patient's bone marrow with that of someone else. There has to be treatment to supress the patient's own bone marrow and immune system to allow the new cells to take hold. The stem cells are given IV like a blood transfusion. The first 90 days are high risk, with low blood counts, infections & graft vs host disease the big issues. Read more...

What risks are there in a bone marrow transplant?

Many! It depends on the type of transplant, whether autologous (self) or allogeneic (other). In general, risks are infection, bleeding, liver lung and kidney problems, infertility, cataracts, heart damage, nerve damage, and chronic immune system dysfunction. These risks can be fatal. Read more...
There are many. The exact risks are dependent on the type of transplant chemotherapy or radiation given, who the donor is (self or somebody else) as well as how close the match is. There are some life threatening complications. There is a high infection risk, effects on the immune system and need for blood transfusions. Nausea, vomiting and fatigue are very common too. Read more...