Related Questions

Can my mother live alone? She has temporal arteritis; she is now blind in one eye; she is insulin diabetic; she has inflamatory bowl disease

It's . It's really not possible to say for sure without knowing your mother's overall performance status. There are people with the conditions you've described who would do well on their own , but there are others who would be overwhelmed by any one of them. I guess my biggest concern would be whether she can see well enough to check her blood sugar and give herself insulin. If she's getting steroids for the arteritis, her blood sugar will be very high and difficult to manage. Read more...
Maybe, . Maybe, maybe not. It depends upon her ability to complete her activities of daily living (adls) and instrumental adls (iadls). Given what little you've mentioned, i suspect that she is full capable of performing her own adls, eg bathing, feeding, toileting, transferring, etc. However, given her blindness, she may have some difficulties with her iadls, eg cooking, paying bills, shopping, taking medications, etc. She should complete a functional assessment by her family physician or geriatrician to determine who much (and what kind of) assistance she needs to stay at home. Perhaps she can get by with meals on wheels and public transportation. Plus have someone prepare all her medications once a week. She may (or may not) qualify for home health. There may also be senior day care centers in your neighborhood that can help provide some supervision during the day as long as she is ok to stay by herself at night. Look around her locale - there are many options to help her age gracefully at home. Good luck! Read more...

Temporal arteritis. What is the worst thing that can happen if untreated? Do you stroke and die?

Death. You may go blind or you could go on to get an aneurysm that could rupture and kill you or you could have a stroke and die. All of these are possible if you leave this untreated. None of these will automatically occur but these are some of the possible outcomes of untreated temporal arteritis. Read more...

What are the symptoms of temporal arteritis?

Symptoms of TA. Headache, the most common symptom, usually begins early in the course of the disease and is present in at least two-thirds of patients. Initially the headache may be the only presenting symptom with the temporal and occipital regions being the most common locations. Tender spots or nodules may be present in the scalp, especially over inflamed arteries. Read more...

Symptoms of temporal arteritis should be what?

Multiple. Excessive sweating fever general ill feeling jaw pain that comes and goes loss of appetite muscle aches pain and stiffness in the neck, upper arms, shoulder, and hips throbbing headache on one side of the head or the back of the head scalp sensitivity, tenderness when touching the scalp blurred vision double vision blindness weakness weight loss. Read more...
Headache. Initially the headache may be the only presenting symptom with the temporal and occipital regions being the most common locations. Tender spots or nodules may be present in the scalp, especially over inflamed arteries. Read more...

What if predisones doesn't help for temporal arteritis?

Usually does! Prednisone usually helps. But the damage caused by the condition may not be reversible with prednisone treatment. Headache, fatigue, etc. should improve with prednisone (usually required long term with slow taper). If there is vision loss or changes, it is usually permanent. Read more...
Rare. Prednisone is veryy effective, and the3 dosge can be manipulated to reduce the inflammatory process. In the RARE case it does not work, several other antimetabolite medications are available. Read more...

How come I have temporal arteritis, but nobody else in the family has it?

Not infection. Temporal arteritis is not infection or genetic, it is autoimmune treated with steroids, can have other body symptoms than headache in polymyalgia---can threaten vision--see your doctor. Read more...

Does temporal arteritis just affect in their 50's or can I afect young men too?

It certainly could. Disease does not follow the usual pattern in the majority of cases. Classical circumstances are found in textbooks not clinics. Read more...
Rarely. It is possible, but extremely rare. One neurologist i used to work with said that unless there is overwhelming evidence, being under 50 virtually excludes it. Read more...

Temporal arteritis: what is the worst thing that can happen if this was left untreated?

BLINDNESS. The arteritis could involve the ophthalmic artery or its branches and cause complete loss of vision on one or both sides. Risk of stroke affecting motor or sensory functions less common but possible. Why not treat it, as the process is potentially fully controllable? Talk to your doctor asap. Read more...