What is the dause of proliferative diabetic retinopathy?

Poor blood flow. Ultimately it is caused by poor perfusion of your retinal capillaries that stimulates a response in your eye to produce abnormal new blood vessels, these can break and cause bleeding and loss of vision.
Duration of Diabetes. The main risk factors for causing pdr are having diabetes for longer than 10 years and poor blood sugar control. Pdr results when retinal blood vessels begin to grow abnormally in response to poor retinal circulation. The new vessels are fragile and bleed easily and bleeding is the main cause of vision loss in pdr. Treatments include laser, vitrectomy surgery, and intravitreal injections.
Can blind you. Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication for diabetes. It involves the elevated glucose stimulating new, fragile, blood vessels to form under the retina. When you have even minor trauma, you can have a bleed under the retina that will kill it. If it happens enough, you will go blind. Be seen for a dilated exam as it can be treated if you have not had a bleed.

Related Questions

What is proliferative diabetic retinopathy?

Leads to blindness. Diabetic retinopathy can be divided in two types non-proliferative or proliferative. Non-proliferative can become proliferative if glucose levels (hemoglobin a1c), blood pressure, cholesterol, and lipids are not controlled. Macular edema can be present in any type. Laser photocougulation or ocular injections are performed for the proliferative type, and macular edema to prevent severe vison loss.
Neovascularization. It means new blood vessels. So if the person has nv, its considered proliferative...
New vessel growth. The main risk factors for causing pdr are having diabetes for longer than 10 years and poor blood sugar control. Pdr results when retinal blood vessels begin to grow abnormally in response to poor retinal circulation. The new vessels are fragile and bleed easily and bleeding is the main cause of vision loss in pdr. Treatments include laser, vitrectomy surgery, and intravitreal injections.
Blood vessel growth. Proliferation retinopathy refers to the growth of abnormal blood vessels as a result of loss of blood flow to the retina which can occur if advanced diabetes. That retina releases a chemical called vegf that causes new vessels to grow which can bleed scar and detach the retina.

For diabetic retinopathy, who is at risk?

All Diabetics. All diabetics are at risk, but the risk is decreased by aggressive control of diabetes. Watch your diet, exercise, and work with your doctor to get the hemoglobin A1c test <7%. The risk is never "zero", but it can be decreased. Data shows that the risk goes up when the hba1c test is >6.5%.
All Diabetics. Anyone with diabetes is at risk for diabetic retinopathy, but the risk can be decreased my keeping the sugar as close to normal as possible. Daily glucose checking, being careful to keep your fasting sugar 80 -100 and post meal sugar under 180, will help you to prevent diabetic eye disease.

What do you recommend for diabetic retinopathy?

Control diabetes. The treatment of diabetic retinopathy involves both full evaluation by an eye specialist and possibly such things as laser treatment and a very serious approach toward controlling your diabetes as closely as possible.
See a retina special. A retina specialist is the correct person to treat the different kinds of diabetic retinopathy. For diabetic macular edema: laser, eye injections of medicine (anti-vegf and steroids). For proliferative diabetic retinopathy: laser, eye injections of medicine. For vitreous hemorrhage: vitrectomy surgery with laser. For tractional retinal detachment: vitrectomy, with laser and membrane peeling.

To avoid diabetic retinopathy, what should you do?

Regular follow up. Regular follow and good sugar control. Some recommendations are the following in children with diabetes initial exam: age 10 years (or after 3-5 years of diabetes mellitus) subsequent exams: annually. In adults with type 2 diabetes initial exam at diagnosis subsequent exams: annually.
Can be avoided. Just like any other diabetic co-morbid risk, ideal control of blood sugar, see your ophthalmologist yearly.
Control glucose. By far the best way is to control glucose. A decrease in hga1c from 8.0% to 7% will decrease the chance of developing diabetic retinopathy by 50% according the the wesr study.

What risk factors are associated with diabetic retinopathy?

Elevated Glucose. Diabetes is the leading cause of new blindnessin working-age adults (age 20-74) diabetic retinopathy (diabetes eye disease) does not have symptoms until the late stages. Diabetic retinopathy is treated with glucose control by the patient and primary care provider and lasers to retina by a physician (ophthalmologist). Newer techniques such as injections of special medications are available.
Diabetics. All diabetics are at risk, especially those with longer duration disease and with poor glycemic control. All diabetics need regular eye exams by an eye doctor even if no new symptoms occur.

Are there different options for treating diabetic retinopathy?

Yes. Diabetes, especially when poorly controlled, can cause bood vessel pathology in the back of the eye (retinal). This leads to small and large bleeding areas, edema, and scarring which can lead to retinal detachment. Eyes with diabetic retinopathy are at risk for vision decrease or blindness. You should be seeing an ophthalmologic retinal specialist, not an optometrist.
Yes. The exact treatment should be under the direction of an ophthalmologist. Often laser treatments are used. Just as important is close conrtol of the diabetes under the direction of your doctor.
Laser or injections. Laser is most commonly used to treat the two main diabetic retina issues, swelling and new blood vessel growth. Sometimes surgery is required if the retinopathy gets to advanced and begins to damage the retina. There is lots of research surrounding the use of injected medications for swelling in the retina.