31 doctors weighed in:
What are the symptoms of pyloric stenosis?
31 doctors weighed in

11 doctors agree
In brief: Projectile vomit
1-2 month old who starts to vomit after meals.
It progresses. Vomit after eating gets worse and more forceful. Sometimes more common in first born males. Ultrasound is diagnostic. Surgery only after the fluid balance is restored. Hope this helps. Laparoscopic surgery is common for this operation.

In brief: Projectile vomit
1-2 month old who starts to vomit after meals.
It progresses. Vomit after eating gets worse and more forceful. Sometimes more common in first born males. Ultrasound is diagnostic. Surgery only after the fluid balance is restored. Hope this helps. Laparoscopic surgery is common for this operation.
Dr. Randy Stevens
Dr. Randy Stevens
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Dr. Tracy Berg
Surgery
7 doctors agree
In brief: Obstruction/vomiting
Obstructed stomach; vomiting, dehydration and loss of electrolytes.
Gastric contents lost as vomit include acids, (metabolic/contraction alkalosis) with hypokalemia (low potassium), the baby needs to be admitted to hospital, for intravenous fluids, pediatric surgical consult and surgical repair of the pylorus to relieve the stenosis/blockage. It can be performed open or laprascopic.

In brief: Obstruction/vomiting
Obstructed stomach; vomiting, dehydration and loss of electrolytes.
Gastric contents lost as vomit include acids, (metabolic/contraction alkalosis) with hypokalemia (low potassium), the baby needs to be admitted to hospital, for intravenous fluids, pediatric surgical consult and surgical repair of the pylorus to relieve the stenosis/blockage. It can be performed open or laprascopic.
Dr. Tracy Berg
Dr. Tracy Berg
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Dr. Charles Vinocur
Surgery - Pediatric
7 doctors agree
In brief: Projectile vomiting
Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis occurs in infants from 2-6 weeks.
There is projectile vomiting. If untreated, they become dehydrated and very sleepy. It is diagnosed by exam or ultrasound and needs surgical correction. The procedure is safe and easy. It can occur in families. No clear reason it occurs.

In brief: Projectile vomiting
Hypertrophic pyloric stenosis occurs in infants from 2-6 weeks.
There is projectile vomiting. If untreated, they become dehydrated and very sleepy. It is diagnosed by exam or ultrasound and needs surgical correction. The procedure is safe and easy. It can occur in families. No clear reason it occurs.
Dr. Charles Vinocur
Dr. Charles Vinocur
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2 comments
Dr. Stuart Bradin
typically non bilious, projectile vomiting, baby hungry after emesis. can lead to electrolyte anomolies- hyponatremia, hypokalemia metabolic alkalosis
Dr. Darrell Cass
This problem will be cured with corrective surgery, generally performed by a board certified pediatric surgeon. The surgery may be performed laparoscopically (with a video camera) to decrease the size of the scars.
Dr. Marcus Degraw
Pediatrics
6 doctors agree
In brief: Forceful vomiting
Pyloric stenosis is a thickening of the muscle of the intestinal wall just past the stomach.
Infants are not born with it, but it develops in the few weeks following birth. The thickening slowly narrows the intestines so that the spitting up gets worse and becomes more forceful.

In brief: Forceful vomiting
Pyloric stenosis is a thickening of the muscle of the intestinal wall just past the stomach.
Infants are not born with it, but it develops in the few weeks following birth. The thickening slowly narrows the intestines so that the spitting up gets worse and becomes more forceful.
Dr. Marcus Degraw
Dr. Marcus Degraw
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Dr. Kristine Thayer
Surgery - Pediatric
4 doctors agree
In brief: Projectile emesis
Progressive projectile non bilious emesis in an infant that is up to 2 months old.
Can be boys or girls, but the first born male child is the usual. Can start as early as 2 weeks of age. The most important point is that the vomit is only formula, any green color is not pyloric stenosis. This is caused by the muscle that regulates the outlet of the stomach become thick and blocking the stomach.

In brief: Projectile emesis
Progressive projectile non bilious emesis in an infant that is up to 2 months old.
Can be boys or girls, but the first born male child is the usual. Can start as early as 2 weeks of age. The most important point is that the vomit is only formula, any green color is not pyloric stenosis. This is caused by the muscle that regulates the outlet of the stomach become thick and blocking the stomach.
Dr. Kristine Thayer
Dr. Kristine Thayer
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1 comment
Dr. Anatoly Belilovsky
Even before projectile vomiting starts, we usually see a very active, skinny child who appears very hungry but spits up a lot.
Dr. Troy Reyna
Surgery - Pediatric
4 doctors agree
In brief: Vomiting
The vomiting begins about 2-3 weeks of age.
It camn be latter up to 6-8 weeks of age. The vomiting becomes forceful and shoots out. The infant will start to pee less as dehydration sets in. Bowel frequency will decrease as less food is passing out of the stomach into the intestine. The infant will become listless.

In brief: Vomiting
The vomiting begins about 2-3 weeks of age.
It camn be latter up to 6-8 weeks of age. The vomiting becomes forceful and shoots out. The infant will start to pee less as dehydration sets in. Bowel frequency will decrease as less food is passing out of the stomach into the intestine. The infant will become listless.
Dr. Troy Reyna
Dr. Troy Reyna
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Dr. Lisa Roberts
Pediatrics
4 doctors agree
In brief: Projectile vomiting
Infants with projectile vomiting (forceful vomiting, much more severe than normal baby "spit ups") should be evaluated for pyloric stenosis.
Poor weight gain and symptoms of reflux that seem to progressively worsen around 1-2 months of age warrant evaluation. Pyloric stenosis is also more common in the firstborn male child. Treatment involves a surgical procedure.

In brief: Projectile vomiting
Infants with projectile vomiting (forceful vomiting, much more severe than normal baby "spit ups") should be evaluated for pyloric stenosis.
Poor weight gain and symptoms of reflux that seem to progressively worsen around 1-2 months of age warrant evaluation. Pyloric stenosis is also more common in the firstborn male child. Treatment involves a surgical procedure.
Dr. Lisa Roberts
Dr. Lisa Roberts
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Dr. Marc Levitt
Surgery - Pediatric
3 doctors agree
In brief: Vomiting, nonbilious
Non bilious vomiting, getting worse and more projectile over a day or so usually.

In brief: Vomiting, nonbilious
Non bilious vomiting, getting worse and more projectile over a day or so usually.
Dr. Marc Levitt
Dr. Marc Levitt
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3 doctors agree
In brief: Pyloric stenosis
Is an abstruction of stomach's outlet usually due to the presence of a duodenal ulcer, put of course it can be cancerous growth as well.
Symptoms are pain that is released with a voluminous vomiting and weight loss. Occasionally if you wiggle your abdomen you could also hear fluid splashes as well. A good examination usually by gastroscopy with biopsy will shed light as to the cause.

In brief: Pyloric stenosis
Is an abstruction of stomach's outlet usually due to the presence of a duodenal ulcer, put of course it can be cancerous growth as well.
Symptoms are pain that is released with a voluminous vomiting and weight loss. Occasionally if you wiggle your abdomen you could also hear fluid splashes as well. A good examination usually by gastroscopy with biopsy will shed light as to the cause.
Dr. Gabriel Goren
Dr. Gabriel Goren
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Dr. Gerald Mandell
Nuclear Medicine
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Projectile vomiting
Usually 3 to 6 weeks of age, more common in males.
Projectile vomiting. forceful ejection of milk or formula up to several feet away,persistent hunger, increased stomach contractions, dehydration.changes in bowel movements, maintaining or loosing weight.

In brief: Projectile vomiting
Usually 3 to 6 weeks of age, more common in males.
Projectile vomiting. forceful ejection of milk or formula up to several feet away,persistent hunger, increased stomach contractions, dehydration.changes in bowel movements, maintaining or loosing weight.
Dr. Gerald Mandell
Dr. Gerald Mandell
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