Can sickle cell anemia be fatal?

Yes. Individuals with sickle cell anemia are at high risk to develop invasive bacterial infections, e.g., meningitis and bacteremia, especially by pneumococcus. Penicillin prophylaxis, immunization, and prompt medical attention for febrile illness have greatly reduced fatality from serious infection.
Yes. In addition to infection, having sickle cell disease increases your risk of having a stroke, which sometimes can be fatal. Patients with sickle cell disease can also develop acute chest syndrome, a very serious condition requiring ICU care. Regular visits to a doctor who specializes in caring for patients with sickle cell can help reduce the likelihood of having these complications.

Related Questions

What is the symptoms of sickle cell anemia?

Many. Basically, sickle cell disease causes disturbance of the blood vessels, typically smaller vessels. Over time, this can cause many problems. Painful episodes, eye problems, lung problems (similar to pneumonia), strokes, decreased spleen function (which can cause severe infections), kidney problems, and o ther problems. Sickle cell disease is not the same in all people. Some have milder symptoms. Read more...
Anemia, pain, crises. The most frequent presenting signs/symptoms of sickle cell include anemia and typical sickle cell crises which include pain crises (severe pain in arms, legs, shoulders, back), acute chest crisis (shortness of breath, cough, fever, lung infiltrate), dactylitis (pain toes/fingers usually as a toddler) and others. Most patients that have sickle cell trait are completely asymptomatic. Read more...

What kind of disorder is sickle cell anemia?

Genetic. With ss disease a genetic mutation changes the gene sequencing needed for normal hemoglobin production.The alteration changes the way the hemoglobin handles the oxygen molecule as it carries it in the blood.The blood cell then becomes distorted in the small capillaries and the spleen.The cell breaks down rapidly and or remains trapped.Anemia is a chronic problem. Read more...