Related Questions

In what way is giant cell arteritis an autoimmune disease?

Inflammation. Giant cell arteritis is an inflammation of the lining of your arteries — the blood vessels that carry oxygen-rich blood from your heart to the rest of your body. Most often, it affects the arteries in your head, especially those in your temples. It is the result of your immune system wrongly targeting your own tissue and that's why it's called an autoimmune disease. Read more...

Can you give me more info on giant cell arteritis?

Giant cell arteritis. Inflammatory disease of blood vessels most commonly involving large and medium arteries of the head, predominantly the branches of the external carotid artery. It is a form of vasculitis. The most serious complication of gca is permanent blindness, though this can be prevented by prompt treatment with corticosteroids. Read more...

What are the safest home remedies for giant cell arteritis?

Steroids now! The only safe thing for proven giant cell arteritis is immediate high-dose corticosteroids (usually prednisone, 40-60 mg by mouth daily) for at least a few weeks, then tapering the dose. These drugs do have side effects but they usually don't cause immediate, untreatable blindness, which untreated gca can. My next procedure today is a temporal artery biopsy to attempt diagnosis of this condition. Read more...
None. Failure to treat giant cell arteritis promptly with high dose steroids can lead to irreversible blindness, stroke, or other catastrophic complications. Read more...

What is the definition or description of: Giant cell arteritis?

Giant cell arteritis. Giant cell arteritis is considered a vasculitis where an individual's on body's immune cells attacked the lining of the large blood vessels. This may be associated with headaches, difficulty chewing, and in severe cases visual changes and even visual loss. This is an area routinely handled by a rheumatologist. I am happy to do a consult if needed. Read more...