Eye floaters from serious eye trauma like a fist in the eye?

Can happen. It sounds as if you have had a posterior vitreous detachment. This is a situation where the vitreous(jelly) of the eye detaches (not a retinal detachment), it then "crumples" up leaving dots, spots, strands of blurry vitreous; i.e. The "floater". You should have an exam to ensure the incident did not tear the retina, which could lead to a retinal detachment. Wait one year then consider surgery.
Possible emergency. Tiny spots/ordinary eye floaters are very common and usually aren't cause for alarm. But if you see a shower of floaters and spots, sometimes accompanied by light flashes, then seek emergent care. When the retina is torn, eye’s gel-like vitreous can invade the opening and push out the retina, leading to a detachment.

Related Questions

Do you get more eye floaters from serious eye trauma?

Possibly. Floaters come from vitreous debris or blood floating within the fluid of the interior of the eye. The more serious the injury to the eye, the more likely it will be that blood, retinal, or vitreous debris will be released within the eye. Any sudden increase in floaters should be evaluated promptly by an ophthalmologist to check for retinal detachment before the central vision is lost. Read more...
Yes this is possible. Vitreous floaters or more serious bleeding inside eye or retinal detachment or retinal tears or retinal holes (e.g. Macular hole) may result after injury/contusion to eye. Post-traumatic new floaters should always be examined by an ophthalmologist (eye md) who examines eye trauma patients frequently to detect vision threatening injuries and recommend frequency of future eye exams. Read more...

What is the best treatment for eye trauma resulting in floater?

See eye md. Eye trauma causing a new floater should be examined by an ophthalmologist for possible retinal damage. Make an appointment soon. Read more...

What can I do about eye trauma resulting in floater?

Seek medical help. Especially if you have a visual field cut (a region of your vision in one eye that has loss of vision). Traumatic retinal detachment can occur. The most common eye injury is a corneal abrasion. Very painful, but usually not associated with floaters. Read more...