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What is the role of pituitary in causing bitemporal hemianopia?

5 doctors weighed in
Dr. Vered Lewy-Weiss
Pediatrics - Endocrinology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Optic chiasm

The pituitary sits near the optic chiasm. This area is where the optic nerve tracts cross.
When there is enlargement of the pituitary or an adenoma, this can put pressure on the chiasm and cause bilateral hemianopsia.

In brief: Optic chiasm

The pituitary sits near the optic chiasm. This area is where the optic nerve tracts cross.
When there is enlargement of the pituitary or an adenoma, this can put pressure on the chiasm and cause bilateral hemianopsia.
Dr. Vered Lewy-Weiss
Dr. Vered Lewy-Weiss
Thank
Dr. Joseph Roosth
Internal Medicine
1 doctor agrees

In brief: Proximity to optic

The pituitary gland sits immediately behind the optic chiasm which is where the optic nerves from each eye cross.
A pituitary tumor or other swelling there of can press on the optic chiasm and cause one to lose vision to each side. Anuerysms of the anterior communicating artery can also do this. Very cool question. One would usually need an MRI of the brain to furhter investigate.

In brief: Proximity to optic

The pituitary gland sits immediately behind the optic chiasm which is where the optic nerves from each eye cross.
A pituitary tumor or other swelling there of can press on the optic chiasm and cause one to lose vision to each side. Anuerysms of the anterior communicating artery can also do this. Very cool question. One would usually need an MRI of the brain to furhter investigate.
Dr. Joseph Roosth
Dr. Joseph Roosth
Thank
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