5 doctors weighed in:
Why does one have low cortisol and high potassium levels in addison's disease?
5 doctors weighed in

Dr. Cayce Jehaimi
Pediatrics - Endocrinology
3 doctors agree
In brief: See below
Addison's disease is a state of low cortisol or hypocortisolism.
In addition to cortsiol, the adrenal galnd also produces a very important hormone called aldosterone. The latter is responsible for reabsorbing sodium from the urine in exchange for potassium. If such hormone is not produced in sufficient quantity (either isolated or in conjunction with cortisol), potassium levels go up.

In brief: See below
Addison's disease is a state of low cortisol or hypocortisolism.
In addition to cortsiol, the adrenal galnd also produces a very important hormone called aldosterone. The latter is responsible for reabsorbing sodium from the urine in exchange for potassium. If such hormone is not produced in sufficient quantity (either isolated or in conjunction with cortisol), potassium levels go up.
Dr. Cayce Jehaimi
Dr. Cayce Jehaimi
Thank
Dr. Alok Agrawal
Internal Medicine - Nephrology & Dialysis
In brief: Decreased exchange
In addisons disease there is decreased production of cortisol and aldosterone.
These are responsible for decreased potassium excretion in urine and high levels of potassium in blood.

In brief: Decreased exchange
In addisons disease there is decreased production of cortisol and aldosterone.
These are responsible for decreased potassium excretion in urine and high levels of potassium in blood.
Dr. Alok Agrawal
Dr. Alok Agrawal
Thank
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