What specialists treat immune deficiency disorders?

Allergy/immunology. Allergy/immunologist are best trained to diagnose and treat immune deficiency. However, since primary immunodeficiencies are rare, the specialist are generally in academic centers. Acquired immunodeficiencies such as HIV infection are commonly also managed by infectious disease specialists.

Related Questions

Where are immune deficiency disorders located in the body?

Everywhere. Some immune disorders lead to more upper respiratory infections, or more skin infections, for example. This is because the different defects in the immune system makes you unable to fight those particular types of infections. But, the cells, antibodies, and proteins of the immune system are basically produced in the bone marrow and travel throughout your body. So you could be affected anywhere. Read more...

Is auto immune deficiency treatable?

Controllable. The symptoms of auto-immune disease is controllable. See a rheumatologist for specific diagnoses and treatments. Read more...
Clear definition. Immune deficiency means that there is a defect in the immune system, and the person is more susceptible to have infectious diseases and cancer. There are ways to help be free of infections. Autoimmunity is a disorder in which the immune system attacks one or more of our own organs, due to a defect of regulation/tolerance. Treatment is with medications to suppress the immune responses. Read more...

Is auto immune deficiency treatable?

Absolutely. 1st: are you talking about an immune deficiency or an autoimmune disease? Both can be treated but they require different specialists so you need to know your diagnosis before you decide whom to see. Read more...

What percentage of the U.S. population has an immune deficiency disease of some kind?

>1 in 1200 household. A US nationwide survey of a sample of household, done by phone, estimated that 1 in 1200 household have a member with a primary immunodeficiency. The prevalence of HIV infection, the most common secondary immunodeficiency in the US is approx 4.5 per 1000 people. Read more...

Scids---severe combine immune deficiency syndrome. What is it and how treated?

Immunodeficency. Severe combine immune deficiency. Defect in the production or function of b-cells, t-cells, or natural killer cells. Untreated can lead to life threatening infections. Treatments include isolation (ie. Bubble boy), bone marrow transplant, and gene therapy. Read more...
Not enough space. Scid is an acronym for multiple immune deficiency conditions in which patients are born with severe defects in immune regulation. Some forms are passed down in families and other consist of new mutations. Treatment varies and can involve bone marrow transplants replacement with immunoglobulins or Adenosine as well as many other treatment options. Early detection and prompt treatment are important. Read more...

How do you detect an immune deficiency disorder?

Medical evaluation. A clinical evaluation ireviewing the medical history and physical exam will suggest an immune deficiency, which can be confirmed by testing the presence of elements of the immune system: cells, immunoglobulins and other proteins, and immune function testing in especialized laboratories. Neonatal screening for severe immune defects affecting t cell, using the blood spots is available in a few state. Read more...

What is the best way to detect immune deficiency disorder?

Multiple tests. A person with frequent or unusual infections needs to be investigated for immune deficiency. The deficiency may be of immunoglobulins or cellular immunity or both. Tests for the two are markedly different and beyond the scope of a 400 character answer. Read more...

When can you first detect immune deficiency disorder? What age?

At birth, prenatal. In families with an affected member who has a gene defect, this gene can be tested prenatally. Newborn screen for t cell deficiencies has been implemented in 10 states. Studies of the immune system can be done at any age if there is an immune deficiency is suspected. Read more...