9 doctors weighed in:
Is it likely to get hernia after rectal cancer surgery?
9 doctors weighed in

Dr. Donald Kim
Surgery - Colorectal
7 doctors agree
In brief: Depends
There are many surgical options to manage rectal cancer.
If amenable to a transanal approach, there is no risk, if laparoscopic, you have a smaller risk than an open abdominal procedure. If you require a permanent colostomy, you have the potential for hernias at the abdominal incisions, around the colostomy and at the perineum, bottom where the anus was. A colorectal surgeon can provide options.

In brief: Depends
There are many surgical options to manage rectal cancer.
If amenable to a transanal approach, there is no risk, if laparoscopic, you have a smaller risk than an open abdominal procedure. If you require a permanent colostomy, you have the potential for hernias at the abdominal incisions, around the colostomy and at the perineum, bottom where the anus was. A colorectal surgeon can provide options.
Dr. Donald Kim
Dr. Donald Kim
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Dr. Tracy Berg
Surgery
5 doctors agree
In brief: Possible, not likely
Hernias come in many forms.
If you had a surgery with an incision on your midline abdominal wall, regardless of the reason for this incision, you could develop an incisional hernia. After your rectal cancer surgery, your surgeon likely told you to avoid coughing, straining, and heavy lifting for six weeks. This advise is to lower your risk for hernia in the incision. Check with your surgeon.

In brief: Possible, not likely
Hernias come in many forms.
If you had a surgery with an incision on your midline abdominal wall, regardless of the reason for this incision, you could develop an incisional hernia. After your rectal cancer surgery, your surgeon likely told you to avoid coughing, straining, and heavy lifting for six weeks. This advise is to lower your risk for hernia in the incision. Check with your surgeon.
Dr. Tracy Berg
Dr. Tracy Berg
Thank
Dr. David Earle
Surgery
2 doctors agree
In brief: Depends
About 15-20% of patients that have an abdominal operation will develop a hernia at the site of the operation.
This rate can be reduced to about 5% if the surgeon utilizes the "short stitch" technique described in sweden, and published in the archives of surgery in 2009. Ask your surgeon to look it up an consider incorporating this simple technique in to their practice.

In brief: Depends
About 15-20% of patients that have an abdominal operation will develop a hernia at the site of the operation.
This rate can be reduced to about 5% if the surgeon utilizes the "short stitch" technique described in sweden, and published in the archives of surgery in 2009. Ask your surgeon to look it up an consider incorporating this simple technique in to their practice.
Dr. David Earle
Dr. David Earle
Thank
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