Is it likely to get hernia after rectal cancer surgery?

Depends. There are many surgical options to manage rectal cancer. If amenable to a transanal approach, there is no risk, if laparoscopic, you have a smaller risk than an open abdominal procedure. If you require a permanent colostomy, you have the potential for hernias at the abdominal incisions, around the colostomy and at the perineum, bottom where the anus was. A colorectal surgeon can provide options.
Possible, not likely. Hernias come in many forms. If you had a surgery with an incision on your midline abdominal wall, regardless of the reason for this incision, you could develop an incisional hernia. After your rectal cancer surgery, your surgeon likely told you to avoid coughing, straining, and heavy lifting for six weeks. This advise is to lower your risk for hernia in the incision. Check with your surgeon.
Depends. About 15-20% of patients that have an abdominal operation will develop a hernia at the site of the operation. This rate can be reduced to about 5% if the surgeon utilizes the "short stitch" technique described in sweden, and published in the archives of surgery in 2009. Ask your surgeon to look it up an consider incorporating this simple technique in to their practice.

Related Questions

Laprascopic assisted low anterior resection of rectal cancer surgery scheduled in 4 days. What are the best things that I should do now to prep for it?

Ask your surgeon. Virtually all surgeons have a pre-operative routine they like you to do including bowel prep. Read more...
Talk to your surgeon. Your surgeon should answer all of your questions so that you are well prepared. In the meantime - take the bowel prep and any dietary changes that he/she recommends. Typically avoid Aspirin or Ibuprofen like drugs. Don't smoke. Continue your regular exercise but don't get exhausted. Arrange whatever help you will need with your house child care, etc. When you are home. Read more...

What do I expect to feel like waking up from abdominal low anteria resection of rectal cancer surgery? Emergency surgery/no time for surgeon consult.

Not well few days. Anterior resection done laparoscopically has less discomfort than open but still is a major intervention and will require pain control and care for 4-5 days then you will improve. Read more...
Surgeon will b there. You will be well cared for by your surgeon, and will get to know him/her after your surgery. There will be a team of health professionals to care for you. After such a major health event, in an emergency situation, rely on friends and family to help with learning and communication. You may need additional therapies after surgery recovery. Read more...

Is it possible to get hernia after surgery for rectal cancer?

Yes. Any abdominal operation may be complicated by the subsequent development of an incisional hernia; this is more common with midline incisions. Other factors that may increase this risk include obesity, wound infections, postoperative chemotherapy, steroid use, and malnutrition. Read more...
Yes. Incisional hernias are possible after any kind of abdominal or pelvic surgery. Read more...

My husband had colon rectal cancer and had a colostomy now he is going to get it reversed I guess I need to know how hard the surgery will be on him he has gone through so much and now its all fixing to be over please help?

It will be easier. Nobody knows how thing is going to happen in the future. However, the reversal surgery , i think, will be easier for him than the surgery he had before. He has been going through a lot and having the reversal surgery, psychologically, will be one of the closure for him . Good luck for him and god bless you both. Read more...
Talk to your surgeon. Colostomy reversal may be very simple (if it was an ileostomy)or very complex - if a "stump" in the pelvis and needs extensive internal work for reconnection.I have done ileostomy reversals in an hour or so but have spent more than 5hrs. For some complicated pelvic reversals.Postoperative bowel function depends on where the colon was removed, history of radiation, etc. Ask the one who knows best. Read more...