Can I have a full, normal range of motion after a dislocated shoulder surgery?

Yes. Surgery for a dislocated shoulder involves repairing the labrum back to the glenoid. The glenoid is the socket of the shoulder joint and is significantly smaller the the humeral head, which is the ball. To make up this size difference, the socket is surrounded by the thick labral tissue. This tissue is torn during a dislocation, repair prevents instability and shouldn't limit motion.
Yes. Most modern shoulder stabilization surgery tries to restore normal motion. Some revision procedures using bone transfers may lead to loss of external rotation. Joint stability is usually more important than motion.

Related Questions

Will I have a full, normal, range of motion after a dislocated shoulder surgery?

Generally yes. Generally it would be expected that you have return of full motion after shoulder dislocation surgery, but specifics will depend on the type of dislocation, chronicity of the dislocation, and type of surgery performed. Consult with your orthopedist for your specific situation. Read more...
No. Probably not right away- and you will need rehab to keep things moving. Read more...

What are some tips for recovering from arthroscopic shoulder surgery done to correct dislocated shoulder?

Physical therapy. Physical therapy is usually prescribed after stabilization surgery. Initially simple passive motion is allowed followed by active assisted range of motion, then active range of motion, and then strengthening out past 2-3 months. Read more...
Unstable Shoulder. http://www.theshouldercenter.com/unstable-shoulder.htm will give you more information. http://www.theshouldercenter.com/arthroscopic-rotator-cuff-repair_after-surgery-after-pillow.htm also shows our preferred supine stretching program. The basic tenets are to gain motion back supine to protect repaired tissue and maximize patient comfort. Read more...

Could you have a dislocated shoulder and full range of motion at the same time?

No. There are two main types of shoulder dislocations: anterior and posterior. Either type of dislocation is very painful and always associated with a limitation in arm movement. I have never seen a shoulder dislocation where there was still full range of arm motion. Read more...
Unlikely. When your shoulder dislocates the ball is out of the socket and the muscles don't work to their full effect making it virtualy impossible to have a full range of motion with a dislocated shoulder. Read more...

How common is it to need surgery after a dislocated shoulder at 51 years old?

Depends. For a patients over 40 with a first time dislocation an MRI is needed to make sure that the rotator cuff did not tear. Assuming no rotator cuff tear surgery is needed only for continued pain, further dislocations or feelings of instability that affect regular activities. Read more...
Think cuff tear > 45. Shoulder dislocations in patients older than 45 are associated with a high incidence of concomitant rotator cuff tears. Often times it is the cuff tear and not the dislocation itself that generates the indication for surgery. A thorough discussion with the treating surgeon will lead to the answer in the specific case you mention. Read more...