What is an insulin pump?

Delivers Insulin. An Insulin pump is a device that holds Insulin in a resevoir and delivers it to the body via a small needle placed, often in the fatty tissue of the abdomen. Insulin is pumped at a rate set by the doctor/patient to provide a continuous flow of insulin. Often the patient will press a button to deliver a slightly larger dose of Insulin at mealtimes. The devices are getting smaller all the time.

Related Questions

What is a remote insulin pump?

Not sure. 2 possibilities come to mind. The 1st is omnipod, an Insulin pump with no tubes. The "pod" that sits on the skin contains a 3-day supply of Insulin and has a catheter to deliver it just under the skin. It's controlled by a handheld gadget that is not connected to the pod. The 2nd possibility is the recently approved glucose monitor, to allow parents to monitor a child's sugar from another room. Read more...
Insulin pump types. the pump used in the USA are external pumps vs in some european countries there are internal or implanted pumps under the skin. I am not aware of any remote pumps. Read more...

What insulin pump is best for a child?

Omnipod. My daughter an many kids use omnipod, the first tubeless pump approved in the us, combined with dexcom for cgm this is the most accurate and most physiologic "open loop" system you can use for your child. Read more...

What are the benefits of an insulin pump?

Stabilize levels. Insulin is used to treat type 1 diabetes (sometimes in young people--juvenile dm). An Insulin pmp allows the diabetic to avoid wide fluctuations in bld sgr keeping fasting @90, an hour after eating < 160, and return to @100 in 2 hrs. Eating 5 small meals per day, drinking adequate fluids, being relaxed while eating, mild daily exercise...Is ideal for anyone. That's less than 1% of americans. Read more...
Pros of insulin pump. The advantage of the pump is that it mimics Insulin delivery similar to your pancreas. Generally with the pump you can achieve much tighter blood sugar control. The frequency of low blood sugars can also be reduced by appropriate adjustment of the Insulin delivered. Fluctuations in blood sugars can be reduced. The Insulin pump has the advantage of being able to deliver different basal rates. Read more...

A trip and am diabetic. What do I do with my insulin pump and transmitter while on the plane?

No change. To be safe, i'd have a doctor's note but you should be able to wear your pump & carry it on the plane without problems. I would show the agent the pump, then walk through screening. They are trained to know what it is. You can use the same pump settings while on plane. 1 study came out in 2011 stating you might get a 0.623% increase in insuin delivery because of the altitude but that's nothing. Read more...

What are the precautions of an insulin pump?

Plan ahead. Things can and do go wrong with an Insulin pump sometimes, so plan ahead for these. Infusion sites can fail if the catheter becomes kinked, or the tip comes out. Keep an extra infusion set with you at all times. Occasionally, the electronics of the pump fail, so keep a written copy of your pump settings with you. For the most part, pumping is very safe, but be prepared for emergencies! Read more...
Insulin pump issues. Insulin pumps do have alarms that signal when the tubing is blocked or the Insulin is running low or the battery is dying. Unfortunately, they do not warn you when the catheter has come out of the skin, which very occasionally occurs. Infection of the infusion site occasional occurs. pump failure occ occurs. Rotate infusion sites. Read more...

What determines the use of an insulin pump by a type 2 diabetic?

Similar to a Type 1. A type 2 diabetic who needs to use Insulin can consider an Insulin pump. The guidelines for recommending a pump are similar to those for a type 1 diabetic. The doctor will look at issues such as the patient's trouble controlling blood sugar levels with multiple daily Insulin injections, the frequency of past low blood sugar episodes, the presence of nerve/kidney/eye diabetes complications, etc... Read more...
Patient and doctor. If a patient has insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes, the decision to use a pump is up to the patient and physician. Read more...

Where can I find an insulin pump?

Insulin pump. Most Primary Care doctors and Endocrinologists get visits from Pharmaceutical company reps and they often leave "pumps" to show to you. Every one will tell you which one is better than the others, but that is your choice. All pumps are excellent and they are improving over time. Pumps are most often used in type 1 diabetes and that is the best way to go. The new systems will improve with time. Read more...

I need more info on a insulin pump?

See an endocrine MD. There are many web sites that discuss pumps, both from the pump companies and societies. See a doctor who does pumps regularly to discuss whether it's right for you. Read more...