What is a remote insulin pump?

Insulin pump types. the pump used in the USA are external pumps vs in some european countries there are internal or implanted pumps under the skin. I am not aware of any remote pumps.
Not sure. 2 possibilities come to mind. The 1st is omnipod, an Insulin pump with no tubes. The "pod" that sits on the skin contains a 3-day supply of Insulin and has a catheter to deliver it just under the skin. It's controlled by a handheld gadget that is not connected to the pod. The 2nd possibility is the recently approved glucose monitor, to allow parents to monitor a child's sugar from another room.

Related Questions

What is an insulin pump?

Delivers Insulin. An Insulin pump is a device that holds Insulin in a resevoir and delivers it to the body via a small needle placed, often in the fatty tissue of the abdomen. Insulin is pumped at a rate set by the doctor/patient to provide a continuous flow of insulin. Often the patient will press a button to deliver a slightly larger dose of Insulin at mealtimes. The devices are getting smaller all the time. Read more...

How does a insulin pump work?

Programmed insulin. When you have calculated how much Insulin you need - this is a separate problem - you program the pump using a set of buttons on the front. You can priogram it for a continuous, or basal insulin, and/or bolus insulin, which are quick boosts given at pre-arranged times. Read more...
Insulin pump. An Insulin pump is a very sophisticated means of delivering insulin. There is a small cartridge of insulin, which can be refilled periodically. Sophisticated electronics control the basal rate of insulin. Boluses can be given for meals based on carbohydrates intake, pre-meal blood sugar, and anticipated activity level. battery operated. Read more...

When is an insulin pump required?

Seldom. Required? Can't think of any situation where a pump is required. A pump may help someone achieve tighter glucose control, including pregnant women, people who need very small doses, people whose activities and schedule changes day-to-day, or people whose basal Insulin requirement varies through the day. Willingness to learn carb counting and to check frequently are key to getting better results. Read more...
Never. Insulin pump is only an optional means of delivering insulin. It can offer persons with diabetes a great deal more flexibility than injections. It does, however come with increased work for the individual in caring for the pump and increased cost in terms of supplies. The best way to give Insulin is the best way that allows achievement of good metabolic control. Read more...

Where can I find an insulin pump?

Insulin pump. Most Primary Care doctors and Endocrinologists get visits from Pharmaceutical company reps and they often leave "pumps" to show to you. Every one will tell you which one is better than the others, but that is your choice. All pumps are excellent and they are improving over time. Pumps are most often used in type 1 diabetes and that is the best way to go. The new systems will improve with time. Read more...

I need more info on a insulin pump?

See an endocrine MD. There are many web sites that discuss pumps, both from the pump companies and societies. See a doctor who does pumps regularly to discuss whether it's right for you. Read more...

What insulin pump is best for a child?

Omnipod. My daughter an many kids use omnipod, the first tubeless pump approved in the us, combined with dexcom for cgm this is the most accurate and most physiologic "open loop" system you can use for your child. Read more...

What are the benefits of an insulin pump?

Stabilize levels. Insulin is used to treat type 1 diabetes (sometimes in young people--juvenile dm). An Insulin pmp allows the diabetic to avoid wide fluctuations in bld sgr keeping fasting @90, an hour after eating < 160, and return to @100 in 2 hrs. Eating 5 small meals per day, drinking adequate fluids, being relaxed while eating, mild daily exercise...Is ideal for anyone. That's less than 1% of americans. Read more...
Pros of insulin pump. The advantage of the pump is that it mimics Insulin delivery similar to your pancreas. Generally with the pump you can achieve much tighter blood sugar control. The frequency of low blood sugars can also be reduced by appropriate adjustment of the Insulin delivered. Fluctuations in blood sugars can be reduced. The Insulin pump has the advantage of being able to deliver different basal rates. Read more...