Can carpal tunnel be fixed without a wrist operation?

It is possible to do. It without the surgery , if it is mild case, use night splint medication and avoid repetitive movement and if not getting better steroid injection..
Carpal tunnel. Treatment for carpal tunnel includes bracing, nsaids, carpal canal injection of cortisone, and surgery.

Related Questions

I need to have surgery on both wrist for carpal tunnel, how long for healing and is there any negitive effects?

6-8 wks. I let people use there hands the day after surgery but they stop activities is it hurts. You are waiting for a ligament to heal and most folks need about that length of time for recovery. Read more...
I . I always tell patients that the time to healing is variable in that no two patients are exactly the same. However typically you can go back to light activites within a few days to a few weeks and heavy activity in 4-6 weeks. Of course this is job and activity dependent. If you are a sedentary office worker its a lot different than a plumber or machinist. General health also affects return to function. If you have diabetes, are a smoker or have fibromyalgia or an inflammatory condition you may have an extended time period. Healing means different things to people. Some take it to imply return to activity others return of normal sensation. I take time to clarify these two questions before surgery. Will my sensation come back or be normal after surgery? While the goal of carpal tunnel surgery is to relieve the pressure on the nerve not everyone will respond the same to surgery some patients will have immediate return of sensation while some will take longer. Some will notice an improvement right away but still feel tingling and will describe this as "numb" the return of sensation is dependent on many factors including age, general health, duration of symptoms, circulation and the actual mechanical severity of compression. In very severe cases while decompressing the nerve stops the carpal tunnel syndrome from getting worse, full recovery of sensation may not be possible. Often this is seen in patients who have muscle wasting noted prior to surgery and in those with longstanding complete numbness and elevated two-point discrimination. Of course there are many in these categories that improve despite having very severe cases. Having a severe case where you are not sure if you'd have full recovery is not a reason to put off surgery, as progression is likely if nothing is done. How about my strength? This is a very difficult question as there are many reasons why a hand with carpal tunnel may not feel as strong. It may be that the decreased sensation in the fingers prevents someone from knowing how tight to hold and object and that object is dropped more easily. With return of sensation or even a slight improvement in sensation, dropping objects becomes less of a problem. Some severe cases of carpal tunnel can be associated with atrophy in the muscles of the hand. In some severe cases, this muscle will never fully recover. However despite loss of muscle, function can still be preserved. In very severe cases a suregon may recommend a tendon or muscle transfer to improve function. So the short answer is its variabole, the long answer above. The best thing is to ask your surgeon what to expect. This answer is for general informational purposes only and is not a substitute for professional medical advice. If you think you may have a medical emergency, call your doctor or (in the United States) 911 immediately. Always seek the advice of your doctor before starting or changing treatment. Read more...
Depends on procedure. For open procedures that use the traditional incision the healing can usually take 6-8 weeks. There is a lot of good data showing the endoscopic technique has a faster recovery time with a quicker return to activity and less pain. Patients in my practice typically use their hands immediately for light activity and are able to work at an average of 4-5 days. Read more...
Go endoscopic. Recovery time is usually quicker with endoscopic release. Risks of open or endoscopic include nerve, tendon, artery injury and infection. Make sure your surgeon is experienced at ctr surgery for quickest recovery. Read more...

After a year since I had carpal tunnel surgery, why do I have pain in my wrist?

See your surgeon. There may be other causes such as a double crush syndrome or incomplete release or a persistent lumbrical muscle and many other causes. Read more...
Could be many things. It is unlikely for you to still have pain from the carpal tunnel surgery. There could be another cause of your pain (arthritis, tendonitis). See your original surgeon if you don't get a good answer get another opinion. Read more...
Therapy. Occupational therapy may help you. A check up with your doctor would be a good idea. Read more...

Is it possible to need wrist surgery as a result of carpal tunnel surgery?

Carpal tunnel syndro. Carpal tunnel release is the most invasive treatment option for carpal tunnel syndrome that doesn't respond to lifestyle modification, splints, anti-inflammatories & local injections. While it used to be an open procedure (imagine long scar down palm into wrist), it is most often accomplished endoscopically these days. Your family doc can help you determine when to see hand surgeon. Read more...

My mother has carpal tunnel in both wrists, also had surgery on both. What are my chances of having the occurrence? We're both similar in stature.

Not likely. is an inflammatory disorder caused by repetitive stress, physical trauma, or a medical condition. There is some evidence that there may be genetic or environmental risk factors, but the evidence is weak. Stretching exercises, frequent rest breaks and good ergonomics are some tips for prevention. Read more...

I keep getting sharp shooting pain in my right wrist I was diagnosed with carpal tunnel in 2010 and had the surgery already what could it be doing?

Nerve pain. There are times when scar tissue causes intermittent pressure on a nerve going through the tunnel, or tendons are not sliding through as free as they should. I advice you discuss this with your surgeon. Read more...
Neuritis. You may have compression neuritis or tendonits of the wrist. In any case, you should be checked by an orthoped surgeon. Ok to use advil or aleve (naproxen) if you are not allergic. Read more...
Fibrosis and. Recurrence can occur if the surgery was done endoscopically. A nerve conduction study with an inching study can help sort this out. Talk with your doctor. Read more...