3 doctors weighed in:

How do stem cell transplants actually cure leukemia cancers?

3 doctors weighed in
Dr. Keith Stockerl-Goldstein
Internal Medicine - Hematology & Oncology
2 doctors agree

In brief: Chemo and more

There are two types of transplants but the most common type used for leukemia is called allogeneic where the stem cells come from a donor. As part of the transplant the patient gets chemotherapy, sometimes in very high doses which treats the leukemia.
The new immune system from the donor can also attack the leukemia cells and lead to a cure. This is called the graft-versus-leukemia effect.

In brief: Chemo and more

There are two types of transplants but the most common type used for leukemia is called allogeneic where the stem cells come from a donor. As part of the transplant the patient gets chemotherapy, sometimes in very high doses which treats the leukemia.
The new immune system from the donor can also attack the leukemia cells and lead to a cure. This is called the graft-versus-leukemia effect.
Dr. Keith Stockerl-Goldstein
Dr. Keith Stockerl-Goldstein
Thank
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Radiation Oncology

In brief: They don't!

Very high dose alkylating agent chemotherapy is used to kill the leukemia, and the autologpus (self) or allogeneic (antigen matched donor) stem cell or marrow elements rescue the marrow ablation caused by the chemotherapy.
The high dose chemotherapy remains limited by other organ toxicities, and is not always sufficient to destroy the leukemia.

In brief: They don't!

Very high dose alkylating agent chemotherapy is used to kill the leukemia, and the autologpus (self) or allogeneic (antigen matched donor) stem cell or marrow elements rescue the marrow ablation caused by the chemotherapy.
The high dose chemotherapy remains limited by other organ toxicities, and is not always sufficient to destroy the leukemia.
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Dr. Andrew Turrisi
Thank
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