I am having a partial knee replacement, what pain and suffering to expect?

Minimal. Partial knee replacement done well should be mild to moderately painful for about a week. By two weeks it should be tapering off. The pain is far less than total knee replacement if done well and with minimal incisions. Post op therapy is very minimal for partial knee replacements. The key to success is precision installation. Look into robotic installation which can be done minimally invasive.
Knee replacement . The issue is not the pain ( that will go away ). The issue is your rehab, rehab is all on you. No pain no gain. The harder you work at it the better the outcome. Got to do it on your own (therapist are there to tell you what to do, you have to do it by yourself over & over& over at home many times a day by yourself. Allow a full year to get accustom to the new knee good luck.

Related Questions

What to if I am having a partial knee replacement, what to expect?

Good outcome. If it is done the wright way for the wright diagnosis. Read more...
Steady recovery. Partial knee replacements are similar to total knee replacements with some differences. The patient will often spend some time in the hospital to recover although some patients can have it done as an outpatient. There is pain, but it can be managed with pain medicines. There is stiffness, but it will respond to pt. Your recovery will be gradual over at least 6 weeks but it can take 3-6 months. Read more...
Pain relief, happy. When done well it is a wonderful way to relieve the pain of knee arthritis or avn, and restore function. The procedure resurfaces the worn cartilage surfaces with metal and polyethylene plastic so that a low friction articulation is returned that relieves pain and allows for smooth motion. Proper implant placement is critical for long term success and robotics makes it precise & reproducible. Read more...
6-12 week recovery. The knee will recover its function within 6-12 wks. It will continue to improve for 6 months or more. You may have pain and difficulty sleeping at night for 4-6 weeks, followed by a gradual return of energy and function. Most patients return to full activity by 3 months after surgery. Read more...

How do you know if you have infected knee after having a partial knee replacement?

It still hurts. Surgical site infections affect 1% of knees but the number is increasing. Mrsa infections are especially worrisome. A knee may be hot, red, and draining fluid, but sometimes unexplained but persistent pain and swelling are the only sign of infection. Work up includes aspirating the knee and sending the fluid to the lab, as well as checking your "sed rate" and "crp" which can be high if infected. Read more...
Unlikely. After any knee reconstruction surgery, you should expect your knee to be swollen, painful, red, and hot. This is typically the inflammatory response after a surgery. Less than 1% of the time, this is due to infection. I advise my patients to aggressively ice and elevate their limbs for 1-2 days, then decide if swelling continues. After 24 hours, contact your surgeon. Read more...
Get to your surgeon. The clinical findings that are concerning for an infected knee are: 1. Redness/pinkness around the incision or knee. 2. Increased swelling around knee 3. Increased pain with bending or weight bearing 4. Fever, chills, lethargy, loss of appetite 5. A knee draining fluid from the incision or a new hole 6. Blood tests with elevated wbc, crp, esr. See your surgeon with any concern asap, don't wait! Read more...

How can you know if you have an infection in your knee after having a partial knee replacement?

Pain and Swelling. Infections in joint replacements can be very hard to diagnose. Generally, doctors with use blood tests, radiographic tests, aspirations (a tap of the fluid in the knee) and some times biopsies to determine if there is an infection. Read more...
Consult your surgeon. Swelling, redness and pain are very common after partial or total knee replacement. Aggressive icing and elevation should improve these problems. If not, or if you continue to run a fever, have drainage from the wound, or increasing pain, a visit to your surgeon is very important. Your family doctor or the E.R. May put you on antibiotics, which can make diagnosis difficult. Call your surgeon. Read more...
Get to your surgeon! The clinical findings that are concerning for an infected knee are: 1. Redness/pinkness around the incision or knee. 2. Increased swelling around knee 3. Increased pain with bending or weight bearing 4. Fever, chills, lethargy, loss of appetite 5. A knee draining fluid from the incision or a new hole 6. Blood tests with elevated wbc, crp, esr. See your surgeon with any concern asap, don't wait! Read more...

How would you know if you have an infection in your knee after having a partial knee replacement?

Persistent pain. Persistent pain swelling and a feeling of being unwell are signs to watch for in cases of infection after replacments. Read more...
Red, pain, drainage. The common signs of an infection can include the following: -fever -redness around the incision -swelling with redness -drainage from a red and swollen knee -pain with weight bearing in a red swollen knee -blood test that show an elevated WBC count, elevated c-reactive protein, elevated esr - the gold standard is to drain fluid out of the knee and send it to the lab for gram stain and culture. Read more...

How to determine if I have an infection in my knee after having a partial knee replacement?

Infection detection. Fortunately, infections after arthroplasty in healthy light weight patients are rare . Many of the standard signs of infection (swelling, warmth, redness and fever may be normal in the early post op phase, yet may be absent even when there is infection, after the joint has been in place months or years. Consult your surgeon. The evaluation may include an exam, radiographs and possible blood test. Read more...
Pain, swelling fever. A bacterial infection always produces pain and swelling. A severe one with strep or staph aureus will create a hot knee with fever and constitutional symptoms. Taking fluid out of the knee for analysis is the most definitive test. Read more...

What is involved in a partial knee replacement?

Knee Replacement. Please see my article about partial knee replacements http://www.Orthonc.Com/articles/july-august-september-2010.Html. Read more...
Surfaces restored. When one side of your knee joints cartilage wears down , you can resurface the end of the bone with a femoral implant made of cobalt chrome and a tibial component made of titanium and polyethylene. These implants are secured to the bone with a special cement. Precision installation is the key to long term success. Robotics has made this a reproducibly excellent joint retoring procedure. Read more...
Partial Knee. With partial knee replacement, only one of the three knee compartments is replaced (or resurfaced). I have a good comparison of issues with partial versus total knee replacement on my website at the following link: http://www.andrewpearle.com/robotic/robotic-knee-resurfacing.html. Read more...

What all happens during a partial knee replacement?

Only parts of the kn. In partial replacements usually the medial or the lateral tibiofemoral joint is replaced; the indications for this are limited. Read more...
Surfaces restored. When one side of your knee joints cartilage wears down , you can resurface the end of the bone with a femoral implant made of cobalt chrome and a tibial component made of titanium and polyethylene. These implants are secured to the bone with a special cement. Precision installation is the key to long term success. Robotics has made this a reproducibly excellent joint retoring procedure. Read more...