10 doctors weighed in:
What part of the eye is affected by diabetic retinopathy?
10 doctors weighed in

Dr. Robert Chang
Ophthalmology
3 doctors agree
In brief: Retina
Diabetic retinopathy causes bleeding in the retina from leaky damaged blood vessels.
The body tries to grow in new blood vessels (neovascularization), and these can bleed as well. Some of these vessels can grow elsewhere in the eye such as the angle / iris and lead to elevated eye pressure.

In brief: Retina
Diabetic retinopathy causes bleeding in the retina from leaky damaged blood vessels.
The body tries to grow in new blood vessels (neovascularization), and these can bleed as well. Some of these vessels can grow elsewhere in the eye such as the angle / iris and lead to elevated eye pressure.
Dr. Robert Chang
Dr. Robert Chang
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Dr. Damien Luviano
Ophthalmology
3 doctors agree
In brief: The Retina
Diabetes damages the vasculature of the entire body.
However, smaller vessels such as those in the eyes, kidneys, and heart, brain, and nerves are affected most severely. The retina is actually brain tissue. The excess glucose in the blood can also lead to ocular strokes (vein or artery occlusions), faster development of cataracts, injury to the optic nerve, dry eyes, and neovascular glaucoma.

In brief: The Retina
Diabetes damages the vasculature of the entire body.
However, smaller vessels such as those in the eyes, kidneys, and heart, brain, and nerves are affected most severely. The retina is actually brain tissue. The excess glucose in the blood can also lead to ocular strokes (vein or artery occlusions), faster development of cataracts, injury to the optic nerve, dry eyes, and neovascular glaucoma.
Dr. Damien Luviano
Dr. Damien Luviano
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Dr. Samuel Barone
Ophthalmology
2 doctors agree
In brief: Retina Blood Vessels
Elevated blood sugar and blood pressure over a long period of time damages blood vessels throughout the body.
The delicate blood vessels that supply the retina in the back of the eye are particularly susceptible. This damage can lead to decreased blood flow, leaking and swelling, and bleeding. Ultimately vision is affected.

In brief: Retina Blood Vessels
Elevated blood sugar and blood pressure over a long period of time damages blood vessels throughout the body.
The delicate blood vessels that supply the retina in the back of the eye are particularly susceptible. This damage can lead to decreased blood flow, leaking and swelling, and bleeding. Ultimately vision is affected.
Dr. Samuel Barone
Dr. Samuel Barone
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Dr. Richard Scartozzi
Ophthalmology - Retinal Surgery
1 doctor agrees
In brief: See a retina dr
A retina specialist is the correct person to treat the different kinds of diabetic retinopathy.
For diabetic macular edema: laser, eye injections of medicine (anti-vegf and steroids). For proliferative diabetic retinopathy: laser, eye injections of medicine. For vitreous hemorrhage: vitrectomy surgery with laser. For tractional retinal detachment: vitrectomy, with laser and membrane peeling.

In brief: See a retina dr
A retina specialist is the correct person to treat the different kinds of diabetic retinopathy.
For diabetic macular edema: laser, eye injections of medicine (anti-vegf and steroids). For proliferative diabetic retinopathy: laser, eye injections of medicine. For vitreous hemorrhage: vitrectomy surgery with laser. For tractional retinal detachment: vitrectomy, with laser and membrane peeling.
Dr. Richard Scartozzi
Dr. Richard Scartozzi
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