Is diabetic retinopathy treatable?

Yes. Diabetic retinopathy is very treatable with laser, steroids, and a new class of medicines called vegf inhibitors. The specific treatment needed depends on the type and extent of the retinopathy. The most important thing is that early treatment always gives the best results. Diabetics need to be monitored at least every year to evaluate for any retinopathy.
Yes. We often use combination of lasers and injections.

Related Questions

Are there symptoms of diabetic retinopathy?

Yes, in late stages. Rarely will you experience symptoms. If you do, it is usually in advanced stages. At that point laser surgery or intra-ocular surgery or intra-ocular injections are needed to preserve vision. Read more...
Diabetic Retinopathy. The entire clinical spectrum of diabetic retinopathy ranges from no symptoms for mild disease to blurry vision (macular edema) to severe eye pain with blurry vision (neovascular glaucoma) to blindness (traction retinal detachment or severe vitreous hemorrhage). Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in people under the age of 60 here is the United States. Read more...

What are the tests for diabetic retinopathy?

Eye exam. The first step is yearly eye exams by a qualified eye doctor. This is the first line of detection. If retinopathy is found, other testing is done to deteine severity and treatment. Read more...
See an eye doctor. When an ophthalmologist or optometrist sees diabetic retinopathy by doing a dilated retinal exam, a retina specialist can do further confirmatory testing (fluorescein angiography and optical coherence tomography) to stage and thus appropriately treat the retinopathy. Diabetics need to see their eye care provider at least once a year for a dilated retinal exam. Read more...

What kind of condition is diabetic retinopathy?

Blindness. Diabetic retinopathy is a main cause of blindness. Exudates are the primary signs of diabetic retinopathy and thereby early detection of exudates is one of the best ways to prevent vision loss. Read more...
Retina blood vessels. Small blood vessels in the retina become leaky and abnormal vessel growth factors stimulate the growth of new abnormal vessels with weak walls called microanuerisms. This leads to the problem of diabetic retinopathy. Read more...

What are the complications of diabetic retinopathy?

Diabetic retinopathy. This is due to vascular leakage and abnormal vessel growth in poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. The degree ranges from outpouchings of vessels (microaneurysms) to leaks, to scarring and new vessel growth (neovascularization) which can bleed profusely. In advanced disease the retina can be destroyed, or scarred with lifting off (detachment) and severe vision loss. Read more...
Vision loss. Diabetes damages blood vessels. In your feet, it can cause neuropathy, ulcers, and lead to amputation. In your kidneys, it can cause kidney failure and lead to dialysis. In your eyes, it can cause retinal swelling, bleeding, and retinal detachment. These can lead to vision loss and even blindness. The key is to control blood sugars and blood pressure, which can save vision. Read more...
Vision Loss. Prevention is the key, because vision loss is common if dr is untreated if signs of retinopathy have reached certain thresholds, laser treatment has been shown to be effective and result in less than half the incidence of severe vision damage. Read more...
Early DM retinopathy. The early warning signs of diabetic change in the eye are important to prevent later, more severe changes. These are rapid change in the vision, uncorrectable vision in one eye, sudden clouding of the vision, hundreds of specks in the vision. Don't wait until these occur (get an early eye examination) but if any of these happen get help from your ophthalmologist rapidly. Read more...

Mention some of the causes for diabetic retinopathy.

High Blood Sugars. Diabetic retinopathy typically occurs in those with uncontrolled diabetes, and there are a few different types. All diabetics are at risk for getting retinopathy, but the risk can be decreased by working with your doctor, eating the proper diet, and exercising to get the hba1c test <7% and close to 6.5%. Read more...
High blood sugar. Diabetic retinopathy is a type of damage that occurs to the back of eye (retina) when blood sugar is high. When blood sugar is high, new fragile blood vessels are formed. This leads to increased risk of bleeding and swelling. The result is the vision can be lost, sometimes permanently. The best way to prevent this is to control sugar levels in the normal range. Read more...
Elevated Glucose. Diabetic retinopathy comes in two types non-proliferative or proliferative. Clinical trials such as the dcct, edic, ukpds, accord, ukpds-hds, field have shown that if glucose levels, blood pressure, cholesterol, and lipids are not controlled diabetic retinopathy can get worse and lead to severe vision loss. Trials such as the etdrs, drs, show that eye physicians can delay blindness. Google trials. Read more...