Can diabetic retinopathy be cured?

No cure yet. Diabetic retinopathy cannot be cured but can be effectively treated and in the last 10 years the treatments have improved dramatically with new surgical instruments for the small percentage that require surgery and several new medications that can improve macular edema (swelling of the retina) and control bleeding. But there's no substitute for good sugar and BP control to slow progression.
Yes. Diabetic retinopathy can be treated with a variety of treatments. New treatments have done a much better job of improving vision than older treatments that usually stabilized vision but did not improve it. The best way to prevent retinopathy is to have good control of blood sugars.
Yes, temporarily. Laser treatment plus sometimes intravitreal injection of medicines like Avastin or Lucentis (ranibizumab) are very effective, albeit temporary, cures for diabetic retinopathy. Exercise and tight control of blood sugar can help reduce the frequency and severity of recurrence. The image shows yellow spots of laser treatment. On the left side, some swelling and bleeding appears.

Related Questions

Proliferative diabetic retinopathy is causing me to go blind. Is there a cure?

No cure. These symptoms can only be adequately diagnosed only after a thorough evaluation by your doctor. This may include labs and other satudies. Once all of the information is in, your doctor can let you know what's going on, and what to do to help you. Read more...
There is no cure . Pdr, like many complications of diabetes can be managed, but there is no cure. The outcome of treatment depends on the duration of diabetes, the patient's compliance with their diabetes management, and the level of ophthalmological care received. Retina specialists have many tools to preserve vision, but the result depends largely on how serve the disease is. Read more...

How often do you need laser treatment for diabetic retinopathy? My doctor told me i'd probably need multiple treatments for my diabetic retinopathy, but didn't explain much more than that. Does that mean after all my treatments are done i'll be cured? (ho

Laser . Laser can be used for different things when it comes to diabetes. If your diabetes is not well controlled and there are signs of retinopathy with new blood vessel growth (neovascularization), your doctor may want to do prp (panretinal photocoagulation). A laser is used to essentially eliminate the peripheral retina, so it stops producing factors that cause the new blood vessels to grow. Sometimes this needs to be applied in a few sessions that can be spaced out by the doctor's personal preference. It works in a good deal of cases but may not be enough depending on the severity of the diabetic retinopathy. Alternatively, sometimes the central part of the retina (macula) gets swollen from leaky vessels and microaneurysms and focal laser can be applied centrally to try to stop the leaky vessels and to promote absorption of the fluid. Neither are guaranteed permanent cures, though they are good treatments, and can often be repeated if the problem recurs. Good luck! Read more...
Laser . Laser is used to treat two main complications of diabetic retinopathy, macular edema and proliferative disease. For macular edema, focal laser is used as often as every 3 months to help reduce swelling in the retina. For proliferative disease, usually one treatment (broken into 2 sessions) is sufficient to control the disease. Occasionally, if you have a bleed after having had full laser, you can have fill in laser to decrease the chances of further bleeding. Read more...
Depending. Depending on how severe your retinopathy is, multiple treatments are needed. I have seen patients who have gotten many many treatment of laser, however this does not cure the disease. Read more...

Whats diabetic retinopathy?

Can blind you. Diabetic retinopathy is a common complication for diabetes. It involves the elevated glucose stimulating new, fragile, blood vessels to form under the retina. When you have even minor trauma, you can have a bleed under the retina that will kill it. If it happens enough, you will go blind. Be seen for a dilated exam as it can be treated if you have not had a bleed. Read more...
Risk for Blindness. Diabetic retinopathy can be divided in two types non-proliferative or proliferative. Non-proliferative can become proliferative if glucose levels (hemoglobin a1c), blood pressure, cholesterol, and lipids are not controlled. Macular edema can be present in any type. Laser photocoagulation or ocular injections are performed for the proliferative type, and macular edema to prevent severe vision loss. Read more...
Control Risk Factors. Tight control of glucose can help prevent or delay the onset of retinopathy. Control of blood pressure and cholesterol are also important factors. It is important for all diabetics to get annual dilated eye exams from an ophthalmologist to determine whether retinopathy is present. Read more...
Diabetic retinopathy. Diabetic retinopathy is a complication of diabetes that affects the eyes. It's caused by damage to the blood vessels of the light-sensitive tissue at the back of the eye. For some of its causes to this link: http://www.Ncbi.Nlm.Nih.Gov/pubmed/16334627. Read more...

What is diabetic retinopathy?

Bad. Diabetic retinopathy is caused by blood vessel damage due to high sugar levels. It can cause leakage of fluid from vessels causing swelling. It can also cause the vessels to die leading to the retina not getting enough blood. Both of these can permanently impair vision. The best way to avoid this is control of sugars. Many treatments exist for diabetic retinopathy. Read more...
Diabetes and eye. Diabetes causes damage to the small blood vessels in the eye, resulting in small areas of bleeding and fluid leakage. This is commonly referred to as diabetic retinopathy, since the bleeding occurs in the retina of the eye. Uncontrolled bleeding and fluid may lead to macular edema, or neovascularization. Regular eye exams are vital if you have diabetes. Read more...
Control Risk Factors. Tight control of glucose can help prevent or delay the onset of retinopathy. Control of blood pressure and cholesterol are also important factors. It is important for all diabetics to get annual dilated eye exams from an ophthalmologist to determine whether retinopathy is present. Read more...

What causes diabetic retinopathy?

Uncontrolled Diabete. Diabetic retinopathy comes in two types non-proliferative or proliferative. Clinical trials such as the dcct, edic, ukpds, accord, ukpds-hds, field have shown that if glucose levels, blood pressure, cholesterol, and lipids are not controlled diabetic retinopathy can get worse and lead to severe vision loss. Trials such as the etdrs, drs, drvs show that eye physicians can delay blindness. Read more...
High blood sugar. Over many years causes the retinal blood vessels to be "leaky." fluid and blood collects in your retina and distorts your vision - this needs treatment. Also, new abnormal blood vessels can grow over the surface of the retina which can lead to bleeding and scarring with permamnet vision damage - this needs treatment too. The best treatment is prevention with good blood sugar control. Read more...

How common is diabetic retinopathy?

80% of diabetics. 80% of diabetics who have had diabetes for at least ten years suffer with diabetic retinopathy. Research indicates that at least ninety percent of these new cases could be reduced if there was proper and vigilant treatment and monitoring of the eyes. Read more...
Too common... Diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults ages 20–74 years. Between 2005–2008, 4.2 million—28.5 percent—people with diabetes ages 40 years or older had diabetic retinopathy, and of these, 655, 000—4.4 percent of those with diabetes—had advanced diabetic retinopathy that could lead to severe vision loss. Read more...

How is diabetic retinopathy treated?

Depends on the stage. In the early stages of the disease, regular monitoring by and opthalmologist is typical. If the disease advances and blood vessels in the eye leak, laser treatment is warranted. Sometimes, blood vessels in the eye proliferate, and laser treatment is used in a more widespread area of the eye. Significant vision loss sometimes does occur, so frequent visits to your eye doctor are essential. Read more...
Laser, surgery, etc. Diabetic retinopathy is a condition in which the vessels at the back of the eye leak, and there is risk of scar, bleeding, vision loss, retinal detachment. All of these are addressed in different ways with laser, injected pharmaceuticals, surgery and improvement in the general care of the diabetes. This needs close follow up with a retinal ophthalmologist. Read more...
Laser. Typically diabetic retinopathy is treated with laser. However, swelling may also require injections. Read more...
Control Risk Factors. Tight control of glucose can help prevent or delay the onset of retinopathy. Control of blood pressure and cholesterol are also important factors. It is important for all diabetics to get annual dilated eye exams from an ophthalmologist to determine whether retinopathy is present. Treatment options are in-office laser, intraocular injections, and vitrectomy surgery, depending on the severity. Read more...

How can I treat diabetic retinopathy?

Diabetic control. The treatment of diabetic retinopathy involves both full evaluation by an eye specialist and possibly such things as laser treatment and a very serious approach toward controlling your diabetes as closely as possible. Read more...
See a retina special. Different treatments by a retina specialist include laser, injection of intravitreal medications into the eye, and/or vitrectomy surgery depending on the severity of the disease. Read more...