12 doctors weighed in:
What does the start of a diabetic foot ulcer look like?
12 doctors weighed in

Dr. Payam Rafat
Podiatry
5 doctors agree
In brief: Many possibilities
A diabetic foot ulcer is best diagnosed with a physical exam. Your physician will ask you to remove your shoes in order to inspect your feet.
They will look for redness, calluses, bruising, blistering, swelling, and for open sores. Sometimes the ulcer may be hidden and will be discovered following the debridement of calluses or the deroofing of blisters.

In brief: Many possibilities
A diabetic foot ulcer is best diagnosed with a physical exam. Your physician will ask you to remove your shoes in order to inspect your feet.
They will look for redness, calluses, bruising, blistering, swelling, and for open sores. Sometimes the ulcer may be hidden and will be discovered following the debridement of calluses or the deroofing of blisters.
Dr. Payam Rafat
Dr. Payam Rafat
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Dr. Ellen Wenzel
Podiatry
5 doctors agree
In brief: Diabetic Ulcers
Diabetic neuropathic ulcerations typically start as the result of some form of irritation.
Either from underlying bony prominence or deformity or improper fitting of shoe gear. Blisters and calluses are common precursors. Trauma can also cause an ulcer to occur in the diabetic when improperly cared for.

In brief: Diabetic Ulcers
Diabetic neuropathic ulcerations typically start as the result of some form of irritation.
Either from underlying bony prominence or deformity or improper fitting of shoe gear. Blisters and calluses are common precursors. Trauma can also cause an ulcer to occur in the diabetic when improperly cared for.
Dr. Ellen Wenzel
Dr. Ellen Wenzel
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Dr. Libby Putnam
Podiatry
1 doctor agrees
In brief: Blister, redness.
Often the first sign of an impending diabetic ulcer is a blister, or an area of redness that does not blanch (turn white) when you press on it.
Once the skin breaks down, it's a full-fledged ulcer.

In brief: Blister, redness.
Often the first sign of an impending diabetic ulcer is a blister, or an area of redness that does not blanch (turn white) when you press on it.
Once the skin breaks down, it's a full-fledged ulcer.
Dr. Libby Putnam
Dr. Libby Putnam
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Dr. Scott Bolhack
Wound care
In brief: Diabetic Foot Ulcer
Any 'blemish' in the foot in a diabetic patient requires immediate attention by a health care professional.
Do not delay! contact you primary care physician, podiatrist, or local wound care center as soon as possible.

In brief: Diabetic Foot Ulcer
Any 'blemish' in the foot in a diabetic patient requires immediate attention by a health care professional.
Do not delay! contact you primary care physician, podiatrist, or local wound care center as soon as possible.
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Dr. Scott Bolhack
Thank
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