What does the start of a diabetic foot ulcer look like?

Many possibilities. A diabetic foot ulcer is best diagnosed with a physical exam. Your physician will ask you to remove your shoes in order to inspect your feet. They will look for redness, calluses, bruising, blistering, swelling, and for open sores. Sometimes the ulcer may be hidden and will be discovered following the debridement of calluses or the deroofing of blisters.
Diabetic Ulcers. Diabetic neuropathic ulcerations typically start as the result of some form of irritation. Either from underlying bony prominence or deformity or improper fitting of shoe gear. Blisters and calluses are common precursors. Trauma can also cause an ulcer to occur in the diabetic when improperly cared for.
Blister, redness. . Often the first sign of an impending diabetic ulcer is a blister, or an area of redness that does not blanch (turn white) when you press on it. Once the skin breaks down, it's a full-fledged ulcer.
Diabetic Foot Ulcer. Any 'blemish' in the foot in a diabetic patient requires immediate attention by a health care professional. Do not delay! contact you primary care physician, podiatrist, or local wound care center as soon as possible.

Related Questions

Can docs explain what does the start of a diabetic foot ulcer look like?

Often it will . Start with a callous...Under the callous an ulcer will form... Read more...
The start can vary. A diabetic foot ulcer is best diagnosed with a physical exam. Your physician will ask you to remove your shoes in order to inspect your feet. They will look for redness, calluses, bruising, blistering, swelling, and for open sores. Sometimes the ulcer may be hidden and will be discovered following the debridement of calluses or the deroofing of blisters. Read more...

How is a diabetic foot ulcer best treated?

Depends on site. This is dependent on many factors: locations, depth, involvement of deeper structures, underlying deformity, present medical status, actual cause (not all ulcers in diabetics are diabetic related) and compliance of the patient. Read more...
Multiple remedies. Wound care requires multi-discipline input for proper wound healing. There are multiple modalities and multiple strategies to get a wound closed but it takes a knowledgeable well trained specialist to know when to implement the appropriate treatment during the course of wound healing using evidenced based medicine. Read more...
Special care. Offloading of diabetic foot ulcers, good nutrition, glycemic control, regular wound debridement by your physician, and local wound care are essential for wound healing. Read more...
Wound care. . Diabetic ulcers will generally heal if you offload the area (decrease direct pressure with an insert, or a wheelchair), have your doctor trim the callus and dead tissue away on a regular basis, and if the ulcer is infected, you may need oral or IV antibiotics, depending on the severity of the infection. Read more...
Dfu. Cannot answer directly as these need to be seen. A well-trained clinician will take a history, evaluate, consider the factors of the diabetic control, the depth and status of the wound (Wagner Stage), infectious considerations, vascular status (clinical and testing), and then push for redistribution of pressure, ideally with a total contact cast. Read more...
4. 1. Keep weight off the foot. 2. Control diabetes. 3. Don't smoke. 4. See a podiatrist. Read more...

How do you correctly clean & debride a diabetic foot ulcer?

See a MD. Do not do this yourself! this is most safely and effectively done by a foot and ankle surgeon. One in your area can be found at www.Orthodoc.Aaos.Org/footankle. Read more...
See a physician. Such as a podiatrist or wound care specialist to get proper care and evaluation. That is just the start. Your internist and endocrinologist and possible a vascular specialist will also need to be consulted to work together to resolve problem. Do not debride this on your own! Read more...
Carefully. This is only something a professional should do. Read more...
Proffesional care. Treating diabetic foot ulcer is best accomplished with a team approach. Optimal outcomes can be achieved when your primary physician work together with a podiatrist, neurologist, endocrinologist, vascular surgeon, orthopedist, nutritionist, infectious disease specialist, and pedorthist when indicated. Do not attempt to take care of it on your own. Seek professional advice and treatment. Read more...
Rx Diabetic Ulcer. There are two main causes of diabetic foot ulcers: neuropathy and arterial. These have different forms of treatment. Unfortunately, both can be involved in the same ulceration so attention by a trained health professional is vital. Contact your primary care physician, wound center, or podiatrist for further workup and attention. They will be the ones to debride the wound and instruct on cleaning. Read more...

Can a silver sulphadiazine topical be used for a diabetic foot ulcer?

Silver dressings. Yes, this medication is a safe prescription medication used as one of an armamentarium in treating a diabetic foot ulcer. All foot ulcers should be seen by a health care professional as the consequences of a self-treatment failure can be muscle, tendon or bone infection; amputation; hospitalization; or sepsis and death. Do treat this condition by yourself! Read more...
Yes. As long as you don't have any allergies to sulfa medications or silver. Read more...
Yes. Some use this type of cream under certain circumstances. Different types of creams are available depending on the needs of the wound. Read more...

Are there any sprays or creams I can use to cure a diabetic foot ulcer?

No. There is no spray or cream that will cure an ulcer. The cause of ulcer must be determined, whether it is circulatory, excessive pressure, infection etc. Read more...
Yes and no. Offloading of diabetic foot ulcers, good nutrition, blood sugar control, regular wound debridement by your physician, and local wound care are essential for wound healing. There are many types of topical creams or ointment that can be of benefit under certain circumstances depending on the type and condition of the ulcer. Read more...
Diabetic foot. You need to seek care from wound center or podiatrist as soon as possible. The evaluation of a diabetic foot ulcer requires a careful history, investigation of your neurological status of your feet, an assessment of the blood flow, and a comprehensive treatment plan that may include debridement, cultures, offloading (which is the most important issue most of the time), and testing. Do not delay! Read more...

I have pad and a diabetic foot ulcer, I have been taking percocet 10mg/325. What else can I do to help?

Doctors. You should be working with your primary care physician to maximize blood sugar control and also seeing a podiatrist for treatment if the ulcer. He may also refer you to a vascular surgeon to improve circulation to the legs and feet. These doctors can also discuss methods of pain control and wound care. Read more...
Neuropathy? It's is also common to have a peripheral neuropathy with diabetic foot ulcers. This could be the cause of your pain and there are neuropathy pain medications that help. Another more limb threatening cause could be from "rest pain". This means your limb isn't getting enough blood supply. A vascular surgeon could help determine its cause. Read more...
Wound care. . Diabetic ulcers will generally heal if you offload the area (decrease direct pressure with an insert, or a wheelchair), have your doctor trim the callus and dead tissue away on a regular basis, and if the ulcer is infected, you may need oral or IV antibiotics, depending on the severity of the infection. The Percocet is only for pain, it will not help to heal the ulcer. Read more...
Special Care. Offloading of diabetic foot ulcers, good nutrition, glycemic control, regular wound debridement by your physician, and local wound care are essential factors in improving the potential for wound healing. Read more...
TEAM APPROACH. Taking an opioid makes me think the PAD is severe and the cause of the pain. You need a team approach with your PCP, podiatrist well versed in wound care or a wound care clinic and vascular surgeon. Read more...