How can diabetic foot infections be prevented?

Multiple factors. Controlling blood sugars to prevent complications. Looking for calluses which are signs of areas with increased pressure. Avoid trauma by protecting your feet and never go barefoot. Check your feet daily. Study conducted by duke university researchers found that medicare-eligible patients with diabetes were less likely to experience lower-extremity amputations if seen by a podiatrist.
See below. Tight diabetic glycemic control, blood pressure and cholesterol control. Proper shoes, daily foot examination and preventative exam by a podiatrist. Cigarette smoking must absolutely be eliminated.
Good habits.. Diabetics should get into the habit of checking their feet daily for changes. Keep them moisturized with good lotion rather than soaking (which can dry your feet out more, cause cracking and chapping), wear supportive, protective shoes at all times, and above all, keep strict control of your blood sugar. Controlling your blood sugar keeps your nerves healthy, and avoids ulcers and infections.
Try. Regular visits to your podiatrist and daily inspection. If you qualify for diabetic shoes they can help prevent ulcers by off loading.
Professional care. Diabetic foot ulcers and infection may often times be prevented with good diabetic foot education and foot care by a professional, tight sugar control, good nutrition, frequent foot inspection and use of properly fitting shoes.
Protect your feet. Prevent friction, keep the foot dry, keep the diabetes under control.
Diabetic foot. Diabetic foot infections arise most often from ulcerations. Ulcerations develop from neuropathic and or vascular problems that diabetic patients are prone to. All diabetic patients require daily examination of their feet. Any abnormalities need the attention of a wound specialist or podiatrist immediately.

Related Questions

What are ways to prevent diabetic foot disorders?

Good habits.. Diabetics should get into the habit of checking their feet daily for changes. Keep them moisturized with good lotion rather than soaking (which can dry your feet out more, cause cracking and chapping), wear supportive, protective shoes at all times, and above all, keep strict control of your blood sugar. Controlling your blood sugar keeps your nerves healthy, and avoids ulcers and infections.
See a podiatrist. Seeing a podiatrist at least once a year, even when you have no foot problems are the best way to keep them that way. A podiatrist can examine your peripheral circulatory status, look for early signs of neuropathy, check for potential foot deformity development, and make sure your shoes are not a problem. Having a podiatrist, as well as taking good care of your blood sugars can reduce your risks.
Control sugar. Regular visit to your medical doctor for glycemic control is very important to minimize diabetic foot complications and prolonging vascular and nerve damages to your feet. Also see a foot doctor (podiatrist) every two months for foot care and foot screening.
Multifactorial. Inspect feet and shoes daily. Check feet every day for cuts, bruises, sores, or changes to the toenails, such as thickening or discoloration. Exercise and walking can keep weight down and improve circulation. Be sure to wear properly measured and fitted shoes. Never try to remove calluses, corns, or warts by yourself. Control you blood sugar. Have regular checkups by a podiatrist.

How is a diabetic foot infection treated?

Foot infection. This can mean an infection in a foot ulceration or one in a bone. Random treatment with antibiotics is not as exact as first obtaining a quality culture from the wound. Some physicians take a piece of the tissue for a culture. A bone infection often requires a different approach including its possible removal. All diabetic foot infections need immediate attention by a wound care center or podiatri.
Antibiotics and etc. Antibiotics, debridement of area and possible off loading to rest area.
Depends on severity. It really depends on the severity. Infectious disease society newest guidelines break down infections into mild, moderate and severe with mild infections treated with oral antibiotics and or topical, but moderate to severe may require hospitalization and IV antibiotics. It's also based on culture results and the type of bacteria that is growing in the wound w/ resistant bacteria on the rise.
Diligently. I would strongly encourage anyone with such an infection to be seen by a podiatrist and not to try and take care of this by oneself. There are many factors to consider with an infection like circulatory staus, neuropathy status, whether or not the blood glucose levels are under control. A non professional could easily underestimate the infection which can possibly lead to amputation.
Multifactorial. Several important factors need to be addressed such as providing an appropriate antibiotic management, having adequate circulation is critical to ensure that the antibiotics is getting to where it needs to get to. Having proper nutrition and glycemic control is also essential to overcome a diabetic foot infect.
Wound care.. Diabetic ulcers will generally heal if you offload the area (decrease direct pressure with an insert, or a wheelchair), have your doctor trim the callus and dead tissue away on a regular basis, and if the ulcer is infected, you may need oral or IV antibiotics, depending on the severity of the infection.
See below. A serious diabetic foot infection requires a team approach including an infectious disease specialist, a podiatrist and often a vascular surgeon. Antibiotics and wound debridement are usually needed. If there is bone infection or osteomyelitis more extensive surgery and often amputations are necessary.

How are diabetic foot infections diagnosed?

Diabetic foot infect. Even podiatrists and wound care specialists cannot agree all the time on this. An ulceration in a diabetic is always an intense matter. All wounds have bacteria on them: some will be considered infected and others colonized. Seek help for any ulcer if you are a diabetic. Contact a podiatrist or wound care specialist immediately for assistance!
Foot exam. Your doctor will exam your foot and will make the diagnosis.
Signs of Infection. Redness extending around the wound and either going up in a streaking pattern or circumferential around the wound, hot in the same area of the redness, swollen foot/limb, loss of function, severe pain (when normally you shouldn't feel pain b/c of the neuropathy) malodor and water or pus type of drainage. Seek attention immediately.
Physical exam. A diabetic foot ulcer is best diagnosed with a physical exam. Your physician will ask you to remove your shoes in order to inspect your feet. They will look for redness, calluses, bruising, blistering, swelling, and for open sores. Sometimes the ulcer may be hidden and will be discovered following the debridement of calluses or the deroofing of blisters.
Evaluation. Be evaluated by a podiatrist: they can treat an infection or wound. Diabetic ulcers will generally heal if you offload the area (decrease direct pressure with an insert, or a wheelchair), have your doctor trim the callus and dead tissue away on a regular basis, and if the ulcer is infected, you may need oral or IV antibiotics, depending on the severity of the infection.

What are diabetic foot infections?

Diabetic foot infect. The diabetic can develop ulcers in the foot that can get colonized with bacteria and infected easily. The ability of the diabetic to heal is compromised. Often, these ulcers are colonized with more than one type of bacteria. The level of infection can advance (become deeper) very quickly and then muscle, tendon and bone become exposed creating further treatment challenges.
Infect. An infection of the foot in diabetics.
Wounds. In a diabetic that become infected can lead to serious limb threatening problems.
A serious problem! When diabetics have uncontrolled blood sugars and develop peripheral neuropathy, they can develop a wound or sore on their foot without realizing, due to their numbness. If the wound becomes infected the consequences may be serious: surgery, antibiotics, even amputations may be necessary.
Various factors. Diabetic patients often times will have poor circulation and a diminished healing ability which makes them more susceptible to developing foot infections. The presence of neuropathy is also a main contributor to the development of ulceration. If not treated promptly and appropriately, the foot ulcer can become infected, .
Infections of the. Feet that occur in a patient who has diabetes…. (they are more high risk as they often can have some degree of neuropathy or poor circulation.)
From bacteria/fungus. An infection arises when bacteria (most often) or fungus overwhelm the body's ability to control it. An open wound is not always infected but can be holding bacteria (colonized)

What causes diabetic foot infections?

Multi-factorial. Diabetics often develop nerve damage, which can decrease sensation especially over the lower extremities. Ulcers can then develop on the feet, usually on pressure points from standing or a tight-fitting shoe. Diabetics may also have poor circulation, which can lead to breakdown of tissue and impaired healing of the ulcer, and high blood sugar allows bacteria to grow and cause infection.
Trauma etc. Decreased circulation, stepping on something, friction, ill-fitting shoes. Un controlled diabetes.
Multiple factors. Any open wound/ulcer has a chance for infection. Most wounds are colonized from day one with normal body flora. It's when the number of bacteria reach a critical level that infection occurs. Daily local wound care is important to help keep the number of bacteria in your wound low enough to allow for healing to occur.
Various factors. Diabetic patients often times will have poor circulation and a diminished healing ability which makes them more susceptible to developing foot infections. The presence of neuropathy is also a main contributor to the development of ulceration. If not treated promptly and appropriately, the foot ulcer can become infected, .
Good habits.. Diabetics should get into the habit of checking their feet daily for changes. Keep them moisturized with good lotion rather than soaking (which can dry your feet out more, cause cracking and chapping), wear supportive, protective shoes at all times, and above all, keep strict control of your blood sugar. Controlling your blood sugar keeps your nerves healthy, and avoids ulcers and infections.
See below. Poor diabetic glycemic control, peripheral neuropathy and vascular disease are the main reasons diabetics develop foot infections.

What specialist should I see for my diabetic foot infections?

Diabetic foot. There are many avenues to seek help: your primary care physician can evaluate you and refer you on; a wound care specialist in a wound center; or a podiatrist that has an interest in wounds are your best choices. But do not hesitate! Seek help as soon as possible as foot ulcers in diabetics can get serious very quickly.
Foot specialist. A podiatrist that is a wound care specialist or a wound center staff.
Referral from PCP. Wound care requires multi-discipline input for proper wound healing. There are multiple modalities and multiple strategies to get a wound closed but it takes a knowledgeable well trained specialist to know when to implement the appropriate treatment during the course of wound healing using evidenced based medicine. My advice is to go to my nearest wound care center first after talking to your pcp.
Podiatrist. A podiatrist is a very important member of your health care team, along with your primary care physician, endocrinologist, etc. We can provide nail care, check ups, wound care, write antibiotic prescriptions if necessary, perform surgery, and get you custom diabetic inserts and shoes to avoid future problems.
Proffesional care. Treating diabetic foot ulcer is best accomplished with a team approach. Optimal outcomes can be achieved when your primary physician work together with a podiatrist, neurologist, endocrinologist, vascular surgeon, orthopedist, nutritionist, infectious disease specialist, and pedorthist when indicated. Do not attempt to take care of it on your own. Seek professional advice and treatment.
ID doc. An infectious disease specialist would be best along with a podiatrist. You also need to be under the care of an endocrinologist or other doctor who can guide tight control of your diabetes.

What are alternative treatments for diabetic foot infections?

Diabetic Foot Treat. Do not try to treat a diabetic foot infection with home remedies without at least having a professional observing as the consequences of an unsuccessful treatment can mean hospitalization, amputation or overwhelming sepsis and death. There are over 4000+ wound care products that are available so even among professionals, opinions vary. Attention to underlying causes of the ulceration are paramount.
With infections. You need antibiotics. The wound must be debrided of dead tissue, the ulcer needs to be offloaded as well. There are many, many topical wound products used as well. Medihoney is the one newer product that can be of help.
Diabetic. Foot infections are serious. It sometimes takes a team approach to treat. I suggest you be at a wound care clinic. You do not want to lose your leg.
Wound care.. Diabetic ulcers will generally heal if you offload the area (decrease direct pressure with an insert, or a wheelchair), have your doctor trim the callus and dead tissue away on a regular basis, and if the ulcer is infected, you may need oral or IV antibiotics, depending on the severity of the infection.
Proffesional care. Treating diabetic foot ulcer is best accomplished with a team approach. Optimal outcomes can be achieved when your primary physician work together with a podiatrist, neurologist, endocrinologist, vascular surgeon, orthopedist, nutritionist, infectious disease specialist, and pedorthist when indicated. Do not attempt to take care of it on your own. Seek professional advice and treatment.

Who is more at risk of developing diabetic foot infections?

Uncontrolled diabete. Patient with a history of uncontrolled diabetes, uncontrolled hypertension, uncontrolled cholesterol and lipids are at higher risk because it damages the blood vessels of the feet and the eyes, the kidneys, brain, etc.
All diabetics. Any diabetic can have a foot infection. One must be careful to prevent infections.
A Diabetic. Who is not well controlled. Improper shoes. Non compliant.
Many factors. Diabetic patients often times will have poor circulation and a diminished healing ability which makes them more susceptible to developing foot infections. The presence of neuropathy is also a main contributor to the development of ulceration. If not treated promptly and appropriately, the foot ulcer can become infected.
See below. Diabetics who suffer from peripheral vascular disease and peripheral neuropathy as well as poorly controlled or non compliant diabetics are much more prone to foot infections.
You didnt. Give any choices? A diabetic obviously. If neuropathy is present this would increase the odds, if pad is present this would increase the odds. If both were present the odds go up.
Sick nerves/circulat. Diabetic with neuropathy (sick nerves) combined with poor arterial circulation are at high risk for deformity. People with the above plus deformity of the foot/ankle or toes are prone to ulceration (s) openning the door to infection.
Diabetic Infection. Anyone is really at risk for a diabetic foot infection and it is important to begin early habits of checking feet daily for new lesions/sores/etc. The higher risk is in people with neuropathy (numbness to feet) as well as poor circulation to the feet. A podiatrist can help you determine better your risks.

Where do diabetic foot infections usually occur on the foot?

Diabetic ulcers. Wherever there is a bony prominence such as the metatarsal heads ball of the foot), the heels, the medial edge of a bunion, or the top of the knuckle of a hammer toe. Some diabetics, due to their neuropathic disease, also develop what is known as a charcot foot or deformity. The mid-foot collapses and bones can then present as additional pressure points in which ulcers develop.
Bottom of foot. It can occur anywhere that there is pressure...Toes and the bottom of the foot.
Multiple factors. Most diabetic foot ulcers occur at the toes, under the foot at the level of the knuckles, the sides of the foot (specifically the big toe and pinky toe) as well as heel. If left untreated these ulcers can become infected.
The forefoot. Namely, under metatarsal heads and on toes. Often, an equinis deformity goes hand in hand with the ulcers under the met heads.
Anywhere. Diabetic foot infections could occur anywhere on the foot.
Anywhere! Toes and weight bearing areas are the most common culprits, but anywhere there is trauma or pressure can become a problem for diabetics.
Anywhere. Ingrown toenails, blisters, calluses and corns, cracked/dry skin, trauma and ill fitting shoes can take their toll on the diabetic foot, especially in those with neuropathy. Have your feet checked by a podiatrist, and take good care of your diabetes.
Can occur. Anywhere on the foot. If patient has loss of protective sensation they need to inspect bottoms of feet and between toes daily. Any signs don't delay treatment.