Is it okay to perform oral after dental bone grafts?

Oral sex? Depend upon how long ago the bone graft was done and if the incision is well healed, so there is not and open comunication with the oral cavity and the area were you are appliying your mouth to.If you are refering to oral sex remember that the genital areas are highly contaminated with many types of bacteria and yes is there is a recent wound the area can get contaminated.
Wait. Wait until there is adequate healing of the soft tissues. If the graft is large and is not well supported by adjacent native bone then additional healing time would be recommended. Discuss this with your surgeon.
Depends. Usually after 3-4 weeks the gums would have sealed over the bone graft. It will be prudent to have some sort of tooth prosthesis to protect the bone graft site so that you would not compromise the bone grafted area. Enjoy!

Related Questions

Are bone grafts common with dental implants? I'm in need of a dental implant, and have been told by the oral surgeon that first they'll need to perform a bone graft on my jaw. I was shocked that I would need that. Is this common with implants, or is my ja

When . When teeth are removed from the jaw, s initial healing will result in bone filling in the extraction site over the following 6 to 12 months. Because "mother nature" no longer needs bone at the extraction site to support the tooth she will not fully replace the bone to it original levels. After 12 months or so the jaw bone will slowly reabsorb resulting in loss of bone in both the vertical and horizontal dimensions. This bone loss will make it difficult, and even impossible, to place a dental implant. In summary bone grafts are recommended to accelerate the placement of the implant, to create enough bone to place an implant, or to improve the esthetics of the area. Read more...
When . When there is missing teeth, the bone in the area naturally atrophies with time since there is no stimulation in the area. That is why it is best to not wait to long before you plan for an implant placement after an extraction. If your oral surgeon decides there is a need for a bone graft after checking your radiographs , ctscan and an oral exam you are in good hands because any time you plan for placement of implants you want to make sure you have a good foundation first. Read more...
It . It sounds as if your surgeon is trying to provide the best environment and to maximize the survivability of the implant. I think the need for bone grafts is common. I also think that people may decide to not do implants because of the additional procedure required when a bone graft is advised. Read more...
Yes. One needs sufficient bone to support a dental implant for long term success. If there is currently adequate bone, then a bone graft is not needed. However, oftentimes one has to supplement the patient's own natural bone with a bone graft to attain enough bone to surround, stabilize and prevent failure of a dental implant and the supporting prosthesis. Read more...
Bone Graft + Implant. Jawbone has a job and that's to hold teeth. Once a tooth is removed the jawbone desolves away. On the other hand, adequate bone is necessary for the success of dental implants. If the existing bone is not enough then bone grafting is recommended to regenerate bone for the success of the implant. So bone grafting is generally an essential part of the dental implant therapy. Read more...
Very Common. In order to place an implant and avoid important anatomic structures, it requires you to have enough bone. If there is not enough bone, an implant can't integrate. Read more...
Not uncommon. Usually when a tooth is lost there is some bone loss associated with the lost tooth. In order for an implant to be successful then bone needs to be a certain m inimal height and width. When the boen is deficent in either of these dimensions the surgeons needs ot repair it prior to implant placement. Read more...
Yes! Grafting is very common, and as the technology advances in implantology, so does the technique of bone grafting. The surgeon who will do the procedure knows if there is adequate support to maintain the implant, and if necessary it is a integral aspect in this highly successful area of dentistry. Putting an implant in insufficient bone is unwise. Read more...
CT SCAN. It is easy to determine whether you need a graft during implant placement by taken a conebeam ct scan. This would allow for the evaluation of the cross section of the available bone width and/or height. In many cases, bone width can be augment by split ridge technique rather than grafting. Grafting, when done unecessary, will add more cost and possible post-op swelling, pain, and complication. Read more...
Bone volume. You need a minimum volume of bone to support your implant. The size of the implant and thus the volume of bone varies with tooth position in your mouth. Read more...
Yes. About 40% of my patients require some type of bone augmentation in order to properly position the implant for ideal restoration. Since implants are not natural teeth, we need to treat them differently. This means we frequently need to add bone in order to allow for the greatest biomechanical outcome so that you function well and have good esthetics. Keep smiling. Read more...
Very common. If there is not enough bone in the site that requires implant placement, ridge augmentation is wonderfully effective. When a tooth is removed (especially if there was an abscess), bone in the extraction site dissolves away because it is no longer needed to support the extracted tooth. The longer the tooth is missing, the more bone dissolves away. Follow your oral surgeon's recommendation. Read more...
Yes, with tooth ext. While others have answered appropriately, there is an almost absolute need for a bone graft when a tooth is extracted and an implant is immediately placed. Implants are conical in shape. Natural tooth roots are ovoid. Placing a conical shape into an ovoid space can leave a gap that will probably need graft material. This also applies to a single implant placed in a multirooted extraction site. Read more...
Yes. Most patients who would like to replace missing teeth have deficient bone volume to place a dental implant. Hence, the dentist first will augment the ridge with a bone graft to provide adequate bone volume to place a dental implant. Read more...